Ankle Surgeons Bear DE

This page provides useful content and local businesses that can help with your search for Ankle Surgeons. You will find helpful, informative articles about Ankle Surgeons, including "Ankle Fusion". You will also find local businesses that provide the products or services that you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Bear, DE that will answer all of your questions about Ankle Surgeons.

David T Sowa, MD
(302) 731-2888
4745 Ogletown Stanton Rd
Newark, DE
Business
First State Orthopaedics PA
Specialties
Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Dr.David Solacoff
(302) 477-0900
2600 Glasgow Ave # 104
Newark, DE
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Johns Hopkins Univ Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1993
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Hospital: Christiana Care -Wilmington, Wilmington, De
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
2.8, out of 5 based on 2, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Ali S Husain, DDS
(609) 838-1400
1400 Peoples Plz Ste 312
Newark, DE
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Jerry Lee Case
(302) 368-5500
430 Christiana Medical Ctr
Newark, DE
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
First State Orthopaedics
Newark, DE
Specialty
Orthopaedic Sugeon

Data Provided By:
Randeep Kahlon, MD
Newark, DE
Specialty
Orthopaedic Sugeon

Data Provided By:
Victor Ray Kalman, DO
2600 Glasgow Ave
Newark, DE
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Philadelphia Coll Of Osteo Med, Philadelphia Pa 19131
Graduation Year: 1986

Data Provided By:
Angelo Anthony Cairo, DDS
(302) 453-1400
220 Christiana Medical Ctr
Newark, DE
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
David Kenan Solacoff, MD
(302) 832-6220
2600 Glasgow Ave Ste 104
Newark, DE
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Johns Hopkins Univ Sch Of Med, Baltimore Md 21205
Graduation Year: 1993
Hospital
Hospital: Christiana Care -Wilmington, Wilmington, De
Group Practice: Casscells Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Jerry L Case, MD
(302) 368-5500
430 Christiana Medical Ctr
Newark, DE
Specialties
Orthopedics, Legal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ia Coll Of Med, Iowa City Ia 52242
Graduation Year: 1960
Hospital
Hospital: Christiana Care -Wilmington, Wilmington, De

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Ankle Fusion

A Patient's Guide to Ankle Fusion

Introduction

An ankle fusion is a surgical procedure that is usually done when an ankle joint becomes worn out and painful, a condition called degenerative arthritis. Ankle fusion is sometimes called ankle arthrodesis.

Probably the most common cause of degenerative arthritis of the ankle is an ankle fracture. Many years after a serious fracture, the joint may wear out and become painful. Just as an out-of-balance piece of machinery wears out faster, a joint that is out of balance after it heals from a fracture can wear out faster than normal. This process may take many years. Other types of arthritis can lead to a painful ankle joint as well. For example, rheumatoid arthritis can destroy the ankle, leading to a painful joint.

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Osteoarthritis of the Ankle

This guide will help you understand

  • why an ankle fusion becomes necessary
  • what happens during surgery
  • what to expect during your recovery

Anatomy

How does the ankle joint work?

The ankle joint is made up of three bones: the lower end of the tibia (shinbone), the fibula (the small bone of the lower leg), and the talus (the bone that fits into the socket formed by the tibia and fibula). The talus sits on top of the calcaneus (the heelbone).

The talus moves mainly in one direction. It works like a hinge to allow your foot to move up and down.

Ligaments on both sides of the ankle joint help hold the bones together. Many tendons cross the ankle to move the ankle and the toes. (Ligaments connect bone to bone, while tendons connect muscle to bone.)

The large Achilles tendon at the back of the ankle is the most powerful tendon in the foot. It connects the calf muscles to the heel bone and gives the foot the power for walking, running, and jumping.

Inside the joint, the bones are covered with a slick material called articular cartilage. Articular cartilage is the material that allows the bones to move smoothly against one another in the joints of the body.

The cartilage lining is about one-quarter of an inch thick in most joints that carry body weight, such as the ankle, hip, or knee. It is soft enough to allow for shock absorption but tough enough to last a lifetime, as long as it is not injured.

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Ankle Anatomy

Rationale

What does the surgeon hope to accomplish?

An ankle fusion actually removes the surfaces of the ankle joint and allows the tibia to grow together, or fuse, with the talus. There are operations for many joints in the body that surgically fuse the joint to control pain. Before the development of artificial joints this was the primary operation available to treat an extremely painful joint. In some cases, fusion is still the best choice.

For the ankle, a fusion is a very good operation for treating a worn-out joint. This is especially true if the patient is young and very active. An ankle fu...

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