Arthritis Specialists Big Rapids MI

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Arthritis Specialists. You will find informative articles about Arthritis Specialists, including "Psoriatic Arthritis". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Big Rapids, MI that can help answer your questions about Arthritis Specialists.

Dr.Peter Zadvinskis
(231) 592-5507
705 Oak St # 5
Big Rapids, MI
Gender
M
Speciality
Rheumatologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
3.8, out of 5 based on 2, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Peter Zigfrid Zadvinskis, MD
(616) 459-8088
413 Mecosta Ave
Big Rapids, MI
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Wayne State Univ Sch Of Med, Detroit Mi 48201
Graduation Year: 1990

Data Provided By:
Angelia Bankston-Mosely-Williams
(313) 576-3724
4646 John R St
Detroit, MI
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided By:
Abigail Russell Smukler, MD
1500 E Medical Center Dr
Ann Arbor, MI
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Suny At Stony Brook Hlth Sci Ctr, Stony Brook Ny 11794
Graduation Year: 1997

Data Provided By:
Harpreet Sagar
(313) 745-4525
4160 John R St
Detroit, MI
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided By:
Peter Zigfrid Zadvinskis
(231) 592-5507
705 Oak St
Big Rapids, MI
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided By:
Wendy Marder
(734) 647-5900
1500 East Medical Center Dr
Ann Arbor, MI
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology

Data Provided By:
Thomas Bryan, MD
(810) 982-9770
1712 Military St
Port Huron, MI
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Wayne State Univ Sch Of Med, Detroit Mi 48201
Graduation Year: 1984
Hospital
Hospital: Port Huron Hospital, Port Huron, Mi
Group Practice: Arthritis Clinics Of Michigan

Data Provided By:
Richard Allen Pittsley, MD
(517) 351-8881
1401 E Lansing Dr Ste 107
East Lansing, MI
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Mi Med Sch, Ann Arbor Mi 48109
Graduation Year: 1973

Data Provided By:
Bruce Leonard Kaplan, DO
22250 Providence Dr # Dr-200
Southfield, MI
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Des Moines Univ, Coll Osteo Med & Surg, Des Moines Ia 50312
Graduation Year: 1975

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Psoriatic Arthritis

A Patient's Guide to Psoriatic Arthritis

Introduction

Psoriasis is a disease that most people think of as primarily a skin disease because the condition causes a persistent rash in various areas of the body. Psoriatic arthritis is a type of joint disease that occurs in roughly seven percent of people who have psoriasis. Psoriatic arthritis affects people of all ages, but most get it between the ages of 30 and 50. Usually a patient has psoriasis (the skin rash) for many years before the arthritis develops, and the arthritis comes on slowly. But this is not always the case. No matter what, patients with psoriatic arthritis must manage both the outbreaks of itchy, scaly skin and the pain and stiffness of arthritis.

This guide will help you understand

  • how psoriatic arthritis develops
  • how doctors diagnose the condition
  • what can be done for the problem

Anatomy

Where does psoriatic arthritis develop?

Psoriatic arthritis can affect any joint. Its symptoms often seem like the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or degenerative arthritis of the spine. X-rays can be used to show the difference between psoriatic arthritis and other diseases. In psoriatic arthritis, X-rays show a very distinctive type of bone destruction around the joint and certain patterns of swelling in the tissues around the joints.

Patients with psoriatic arthritis fall into three groups. Many patients have what is called asymmetric arthritis. This means that only a few joints are involved and that it does not occur in the same joints on both sides of the body. (For example, only one wrist and one foot are affected.)

An equal number of patients suffer from symmetric polyarthritis. This means that arthritis occurs in several corresponding joints on both sides of the body. (For example, both elbows, both knees, and both hands are affected.) The polyarthritis type of psoriatic arthritis is much like RA.

A third group has mostly axial disease. This refers to arthritis of the spine, the sacroiliac joint (where the pelvis and bottom of the spine meet), or the hip and shoulder joints. Patients do not necessarily stay in the same category. Over time, the pattern may change. Doctors use these categories to better understand the disease and to follow the progression of the arthritis. The treatment is basically the same.

Causes

Why do I have this problem?

The exact cause of psoriatic arthritis is not known. Many factors seem to be involved in its development. Heredity--your genes--plays a major role. People who are closely related to someone with psoriatic arthritis are 50 times more likely to develop the disease themselves. Recent studies have located genetic markers shared by most people who have the disease.

Sometimes injuries seem to set off psoriatic arthritis. Infections also contribute to the disease. It is known that strep infections in children can cause psoriasis. Some researchers think that the arthritis may be...

Click here to read the rest of this article from eOrthopod.com