Arthritis Therapy Godfrey IL

Local resource for arthritis therapy in Godfrey. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to arthritis pain relief, arthritis medication, arthritis natural treatments, rheumatoid arthritis treatments, physical therapy, and occupational therapy, as well as advice and content on arthritis surgery.

Teresa Jean Oglesby, MD
(314) 362-6978
231 Behlmann Meadows Way
Florissant, MO
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of South Al Coll Of Med, Mobile Al 36688
Graduation Year: 1980

Data Provided By:
David S Rosenberg
(314) 921-4420
1120 Shackelford Rd
Florissant, MO
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided By:
Francisco J Garriga
(314) 921-4420
1120 Shackelford Rd
Florissant, MO
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided By:
Charlotte Harris
(312) 942-6641
1725 W Harrison St
Chicago, IL
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided By:
Joseph Edward Fojtik, MD
(847) 516-6000
728 Northwest Hwy
Cary, IL
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Il Coll Of Med, Chicago Il 60680
Graduation Year: 1984
Hospital
Hospital: Good Shepherd Hosp, Barrington, Il
Group Practice: Mercy Health Systems

Data Provided By:
David Stanley Rosenberg, MD
(314) 921-4420
1120 Shackelford Rd
Florissant, MO
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tx Med Sch At San Antonio, San Antonio Tx 78284
Graduation Year: 1972
Hospital
Hospital: Christian Hosp Northeast, Saint Louis, Mo
Group Practice: North County Medicine

Data Provided By:
Francisco Javier Garriga, MD
(314) 921-4420
1120 Shackelford Rd
Florissant, MO
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Languages
Spanish
Education
Medical School: Washington Univ Sch Of Med, St Louis Mo 63110
Graduation Year: 1970
Hospital
Hospital: Depaul Health Center, Bridgeton, Mo; Christian Hosp Northeast, Saint Louis, Mo
Group Practice: North County Medicine

Data Provided By:
Anastacia Maldonado
(217) 383-3311
602 W University Ave
Urbana, IL
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided By:
Ira Francis Fenton, DO
(847) 367-7340
10 W Phillip Rd Ste 104
Vernon Hills, IL
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Des Moines Univ, Coll Osteo Med & Surg, Des Moines Ia 50312
Graduation Year: 1978
Hospital
Hospital: Condell Med Ctr, Libertyville, Il; St Therese Med Ctr, Waukegan, Il
Group Practice: Round Lake Med Assoc

Data Provided By:
Shiva Arami, MD
(847) 297-0709
1801 West Taylor Street 3s F13
Chicago, IL
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Finch U Of Hs/Chicago Med Sch, North Chicago Il 60664
Graduation Year: 1996

Data Provided By:
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New, Targeted Therapies for Arthritis

There are many different types of rheumatological diseases. A rheumatological disease is an inflammatory arthritis that affects the entire body as a whole. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common rheumatologic disease. Certain types of rheumatoid arthritis seem to target specific joints.

When a rheumatological disease affects the spine, the resulting conditon is called a spondyloarthropathy. The term is made up of Greek words: Spondylo means vertebra, arthro means joint and pathos means disease. When other more peripheral joints are affected (such as in the arms and legs), the rheumatologic arthritis is referred to as an spondyloarthritide.

In this article, Dr. Philip J. Mease from the Division of Rheumatology, University School of Medicine in Seattle, Washington gives us an update on two of the more common spondyloarthropathies: psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Psoriatric arthritis affects the peripheral joints. Ankylosing spondylitis affects the spine.

New findings in the field have brought these conditions and their treatment to our attention. The first major breakthrough in understanding and treating these diseases is in the area of pathophysiology. Pathophysiology tells us what went wrong at the cellular level to cause these problems.

Researchers are identifying specific differences between rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthropathies. Their work in the field of osteoimmunology is helping determine what's going on between the bone cells (osteo) and the immune system. This knowledge has led to more refined development of specific drug treatments for these two types of arthritis. That's good news for anyone suffering from any kind of rheumatologic disease.

For example, MRIs of patients with spondyloarthropathies show bone edema before any actual bone damage occurs in the joints. At the same time, they have found nests of lymphocytes (white blood cells), bone cells, and blood in the bone marrow (inside bones) of patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Though the exact meaining of these findings are unknown, they point in a direction to help drug manufacturers develop medications that could stop this process.

Measuring the effect of therapy on disease activity is one way to assess new treatments. Studies look at before and after outcomes of therapy on affected joints, skin, pain, function, fatigue, and quality of life. The therapeutic effects of treatment on disease activity can be difficult to measure -- especially when those changes occur at the cellular level. MRIs and X-rays may be helpful.

Patient-reported outcomes using various surveys can help track patient perceived changes, too. Some of these tools include the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Function Index (BASFI), and the Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life (ASQoL) questionnaire.

Standard treatment of mild spondyloarthropathies start...

Click here to read the rest of this article from eOrthopod.com

Local Events

SNA Annual National Conference 2019 - School Nutrition Association
Dates: 7/14/2019 – 7/17/2019
Location:
Venue TBD Saint Louis
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