Arthritis Therapy Middleton WI

Local resource for arthritis therapy in Middleton. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to arthritis pain relief, arthritis medication, arthritis natural treatments, rheumatoid arthritis treatments, physical therapy, and occupational therapy, as well as advice and content on arthritis surgery.

Karen Easley Hansen
(608) 263-7577
451 Junction Rd
Madison, WI
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology

Data Provided By:
Kevin Mark Mc Kown, MD
(608) 263-7577
451 Junction Rd
Madison, WI
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Wayne State Univ Sch Of Med, Detroit Mi 48201
Graduation Year: 1983

Data Provided By:
Alan J Bridges
(608) 263-7577
451 Junction Rd
Madison, WI
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided By:
Daniel G Malone
(608) 263-7577
451 Junction Rd
Madison, WI
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided By:
Housam Aldeen Sarakbi, MD
Madison, WI
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Damascus, Fac Of Med, Damascus, Syria
Graduation Year: 1990

Data Provided By:
Carolyn L Bell
(608) 263-7577
451 Junction Rd
Madison, WI
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided By:
Susan J Lawrence
(608) 265-7700
451 Junction Rd
Madison, WI
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided By:
Daniel Muller
(608) 263-7577
451 Junction Rd
Madison, WI
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided By:
Michael B Walsh, DO
(262) 495-2133
301 S Yellowstone Dr Apt 202
Madison, WI
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Wayne State Univ Sch Of Med, Detroit Mi 48201
Graduation Year: 1985

Data Provided By:
Karen Elizabeth Hansen, MD
(608) 263-7740
1209 Sweetbriar Rd
Madison, WI
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Wi Med Sch, Madison Wi 53706
Graduation Year: 1993

Data Provided By:
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New, Targeted Therapies for Arthritis

There are many different types of rheumatological diseases. A rheumatological disease is an inflammatory arthritis that affects the entire body as a whole. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common rheumatologic disease. Certain types of rheumatoid arthritis seem to target specific joints.

When a rheumatological disease affects the spine, the resulting conditon is called a spondyloarthropathy. The term is made up of Greek words: Spondylo means vertebra, arthro means joint and pathos means disease. When other more peripheral joints are affected (such as in the arms and legs), the rheumatologic arthritis is referred to as an spondyloarthritide.

In this article, Dr. Philip J. Mease from the Division of Rheumatology, University School of Medicine in Seattle, Washington gives us an update on two of the more common spondyloarthropathies: psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Psoriatric arthritis affects the peripheral joints. Ankylosing spondylitis affects the spine.

New findings in the field have brought these conditions and their treatment to our attention. The first major breakthrough in understanding and treating these diseases is in the area of pathophysiology. Pathophysiology tells us what went wrong at the cellular level to cause these problems.

Researchers are identifying specific differences between rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthropathies. Their work in the field of osteoimmunology is helping determine what's going on between the bone cells (osteo) and the immune system. This knowledge has led to more refined development of specific drug treatments for these two types of arthritis. That's good news for anyone suffering from any kind of rheumatologic disease.

For example, MRIs of patients with spondyloarthropathies show bone edema before any actual bone damage occurs in the joints. At the same time, they have found nests of lymphocytes (white blood cells), bone cells, and blood in the bone marrow (inside bones) of patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Though the exact meaining of these findings are unknown, they point in a direction to help drug manufacturers develop medications that could stop this process.

Measuring the effect of therapy on disease activity is one way to assess new treatments. Studies look at before and after outcomes of therapy on affected joints, skin, pain, function, fatigue, and quality of life. The therapeutic effects of treatment on disease activity can be difficult to measure -- especially when those changes occur at the cellular level. MRIs and X-rays may be helpful.

Patient-reported outcomes using various surveys can help track patient perceived changes, too. Some of these tools include the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Function Index (BASFI), and the Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life (ASQoL) questionnaire.

Standard treatment of mild spondyloarthropathies start...

Click here to read the rest of this article from eOrthopod.com