Arthroscopic Surgery for Dorsal Wrist Impingement Waupaca WI

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James Henry De Weerd, MD
(715) 345-5100
190 Grand Seasons Dr
Waupaca, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Bowman Gray Sch Of Med Of Wake Forest Univ, Winston-Salem Nc 27157
Graduation Year: 1972

Data Provided By:
Kim Harold Lulloff, MD
Waupaca, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Coll Of Wi, Milwaukee Wi 53226
Graduation Year: 1960

Data Provided By:
Sean P Keane MD
(414) 277-1155
2015 E Newport Ave
Milwaukee, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
William Robert Padgett, MD
(715) 369-2300
444 E Timber Dr
Rhinelander, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Oh State Univ Coll Of Med, Columbus Oh 43210
Graduation Year: 1996

Data Provided By:
Kenneth D Stone
(715) 387-9227
1000 N Oak Ave
Marshfield, WI
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
David Michael Henneghan, MD
(715) 342-7950
190 Grand Seasons Dr
Waupaca, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Mi State Univ Coll Of Human Med, East Lansing Mi 48824
Graduation Year: 1984
Hospital
Hospital: St Michaels Hospital, Stevens Point, Wi
Group Practice: Ministry Health Care At Rice Medical Center; Rice Medical Center Ministry Health Care

Data Provided By:
Dr. Rodney Lefler
Neuroscience Group of NE Wisconsin
920-725-9373 or toll free 800-201-1194
1305 W. American Drive
Neenah, WI
Specialty
Chiropractor
Conditions
Cervical spine disorders,Degenerative disc disease,Degenerative spinal conditions,Herniated disc / bulging disc,Lumbar spine disorders,Muscle pain / muscle strain,Neck pain,Sciatica / radiculopathy,Scoliosis and deformity,Spinal stenosis,Spondylolisthesis,Sports injuries,Thoracic spine disorders,Whiplash
Treatments
Exercise,McKenzie Method,Musculoskeletal manipulation,Physical therapy,Rehabilitation,Sports medicine,Strength and Conditioning
Proffesional Affiliation
Wisconsin Chiropractic Association,National Strength and Conditioning Association

John Arthur Schneider
(414) 647-0033
2025 W Oklahoma Ave
Milwaukee, WI
Specialty
Hand Surgery

Data Provided By:
Lance E Sathoff
(608) 324-2000
515 22nd Ave
Monroe, WI
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
David R Zeman
(608) 252-8000
1313 Fish Hatchery Rd
Madison, WI
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Arthroscopic Surgery for Dorsal Wrist Impingement

Dorsal wrist impingement is an injury where the back of the radius (one of the forearm bones) hits against the wrist bones and traps the nerves. It's a common injury, particularly in sports like gymnastics, where the gymnasts place a lot of force on their wrists with hand springs and walk overs. However, it can also occur from a minor injury.

When a patient has a dorsal wrist impingement, there is usually pain on the top of the wrist, especially when the hand is bent back towards the shoulder, as when pushing a door open. Usually, the first treatment for the problem is injections of a corticosteroid to the painful area and rest. Unfortunately, not all cases respond to this and then surgery may be necessary.

There is no specific test to diagnose dorsal wrist impingement. It's not seen on x-ray or imaging, for example. So doctors have to rely on the patient's history of the injury and by ruling out other problems that may be causing the wrist pain. Dorsal wrist impingement has specific location of pain and this pain can be brought on by certain wrist movements. Also, if it truly is dorsal wrist impingement, corticosteroid injections should have helped relieve the pain somewhat - perhaps relieving up to 70 percent of the pain, for several weeks. So, in order to decide on surgery, the patient should have been treated with at least one or two corticosteroid injections and have rested the wrist for at least three months.

Patients who should not have this surgery are those for whom dorsal wrist impingement can't be absolutely diagnosed, as well as those who are in poor health, if a patient isn't compliant with treatments, or has an infection.

Following surgery, the wrist isn't braced or casted. In fact, wrist movement is encouraged and the goal is to have full range of motion of the wrist within two to three weeks of surgery. Strength rehabilitation begins once range of motion is full and patients generally are able to return to office-type work wit...

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