Arthroscopy North Platte NE

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Benjamin Bissell, MD
North Platte, NE
Specialty
Orthopaedic Sugeon

Data Provided By:
John David Hannah, MD
(308) 534-6655
611 W Francis St Ste 290
North Platte, NE
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Loma Linda Univ Sch Of Med, Loma Linda Ca 92350
Graduation Year: 1993

Data Provided By:
Mark Kimball Mc Kenzie, MD
(308) 534-6655
3000 W Leota St
North Platte, NE
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Sd Sch Of Med, Vermillion Sd, 57069
Graduation Year: 1986

Data Provided By:
Dennis P McGowan, MD
(308) 237-0889
1215 First Ave
Kearney, NE
Business
Dennis P McGowan MD
Specialties
Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Kelly Richard Conway, DDS
(402) 393-2300
535 N 87th St
Omaha, NE
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Peter B Brassard, MD
(308) 534-6655
611 W Francis St Ste 290
North Platte, NE
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Georgetown Univ Sch Of Med, Washington Dc 20007
Graduation Year: 1971

Data Provided By:
John W Haugen, DDS
(308) 534-1783
611 W Francis St # 230
North Platte, NE
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Benjamin Bissell, MD
(308) 534-6655
215 McNeel Lane
North Platte, NE
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgeon, Sports Medicine

Bruce A Miller, MD
(402) 436-2000
PO Box 6939
Lincoln, NE
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Oh State Univ Coll Of Med, Columbus Oh 43210
Graduation Year: 1962
Hospital
Hospital: Lincoln General Hospital, Lincoln, Ne; St Elizabeth Comm Hlth Center, Lincoln, Ne
Group Practice: Lincoln Orthopaedic Center Pc

Data Provided By:
Thomas Mark Heiser, MD
(402) 488-3322
575 S 70th St Ste 200
Lincoln, NE
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ne Coll Of Med, Omaha Ne 68198
Graduation Year: 1979
Hospital
Hospital: St Elizabeth Comm Hlth Center, Lincoln, Ne
Group Practice: Nebraska Orthopaedic Assoc

Data Provided By:
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Arthroscopy

A Patient's Guide to Arthroscopy

Introduction

Until recently, surgery on the inside of any joint meant making a large incision and opening the joint to do even the most minor procedure. Twenty years ago, fiber optics began changing all that and is continuing to change how orthopedic surgeons operate on joints in the body.

  • What is arthroscopy?
  • How is it used?
  • Why is it better?
  • What joints are being scoped?
  • What goes on during an arthroscopy?
  • What are the risks of arthroscopy?
  • What should I do after my arthroscopy?
  • What is it?

    The term arthroscopy basically means to look into the joint. (Arthro means joint, and scopy means look.) So the common phrase scope the joint means to insert an arthroscope into the joint and have a look. In the early days before the development of miniature video cameras, about all the surgeon could do was take a look.

    Over the past several years, the development of very small video cameras and specialized instruments have allowed surgeons to do more than simply take a look into the joint. The arthroscope is now used more and more for actual surgical procedures.

    How is it used?

    Using the arthroscope to assist with joint surgery usually involves making smaller incisions into the joint than those made in a regular open-incision surgery. Once the arthroscope is inserted into the joint, it is used first to try to see the problem. In this way, the problem can be confirmed before making any large incisions and causing any damage unnecessarily. Using the arthroscope as his eyes the surgeon can then use small specialized instruments inserted into the joint through other small incisions to perform the operation. As surgeons have become familiar with this type of surgery, more surgical procedures that were once done with large incisions are now being done arthroscopically.

    Why is it better?

    All surgical procedures that are done result in damage to tissues that are otherwise normal, because an incision must be made to see the problem. This is particularly bothersome for joints because to enter a joint, the joint capsule and ligaments must be incised (cut into). For minor surgical procedures inside the joint, it is not unusual for the recovery time to be much longer. This is because the normal tissues that were cut must also heal. Also, large incisions into the joint to perform surgical procedures increase the chances for infection. Long procedures where the joint is open to the air can lead to injury to the articular cartilage (the smooth surface of all joints) because it dries the cartilage out.

    Arthroscopy causes less damage to normal structures by requiring much smaller incisions through the joint capsule and ligaments around the joint. Arthroscopy also allows the joint to remain closed and reduces the risk of infection and drying out of the articular cartilage. Because of this, the healing time for most arthroscopic procedures is greatly reduced. Rehabilitat...

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