Artificial Ankle Replacement Washington DC

This page provides useful content and local businesses that can help with your search for Artificial Ankle Replacement. You will find helpful, informative articles about Artificial Ankle Replacement, including "Artificial Joint Replacement of the Ankle". You will also find local businesses that provide the products or services that you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Washington, DC that will answer all of your questions about Artificial Ankle Replacement.

David C Johnson, MD
(202) 291-9266
106 Irving St NW
Washington, DC
Business
National Orthopedics PC
Specialties
Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Edward G Alexander Jr., MD
(703) 461-7100
4801 Kenmore Ave
Alexandria, VA
Business
Northern Virginia Orthopaedic Group
Specialties
Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Julian Anthony Cameron, MD
Washington, DC
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Miami Sch Of Med, Miami Fl 33101
Graduation Year: 2000

Data Provided By:
Charles F Sanders, DDS
(202) 589-1360
Howard University School of Dentistry
Washington, DC
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Dr.Benjamin Shaffer
(202) 833-1147
2021 K St NW # 516
Washington, DC
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Fl Coll Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1984
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 4, reviews.

Data Provided By:
James E Callan MD
(301) 891-6130
7610 Carroll Ave
Takoma Park, MD
Specialties
Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Gregory Martin Ford, MD
(202) 898-5355
1810 5th St NW
Washington, DC
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Mi Med Sch, Ann Arbor Mi 48109
Graduation Year: 1980

Data Provided By:
Thesselon W Monderson, MD
(202) 865-1182
Washington, DC
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided By:
John Anthony Boudreau, MD
(248) 914-0792
22 S Greene St,
Washington, DC
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Wayne State Univ Sch Of Med, Detroit Mi 48201
Graduation Year: 2000

Data Provided By:
William Le Roy Burner, MD
(202) 898-5204
1011 N Capitol St NE
Washington, DC
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Va Commonwealth Univ, Med Coll Of Va Sch Of Med, Richmond Va 23298
Graduation Year: 1969

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Artificial Joint Replacement of the Ankle

A Patient's Guide to Artificial Joint Replacement of the Ankle

Introduction

Surgery to replace the ankle joint with an artificial joint (called ankle arthroplasty) is becoming more common. This surgery is not done as often as replacement of the knee or hip joints. Still, when necessary, this operation can reduce the pain from arthritis of the ankle. Recent advances in the design of the artificial ankle and changes in the way the operation is performed have made artificial ankle replacement a growing alternative to ankle fusion for the treatment of ankle arthritis.

This guide will help you understand

  • why artificial ankle replacement becomes necessary
  • what happens during surgery
  • what to expect after treatment

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Osteoarthritis of the Ankle

Anatomy

How does the ankle joint work?

The ankle joint is made up of three bones: the lower end of the tibia (shinbone), the fibula (the small bone of the lower leg), and the talus, the bone that fits into the socket formed by the tibia and fibula. The talus sits on top of the calcaneus (the heelbone). The talus moves mainly in one direction. It works like a hinge to allow your foot to move up and down.

Ligaments on both sides of the ankle joint help hold the bones together. Many tendons cross the ankle to move the ankle and the toes. (Ligaments connect bone to bone, while tendons connect muscle to bone.) The large Achilles tendon at the back of the ankle is the most powerful tendon in the foot. It connects the calf muscles to the heelbone and gives the foot the power for walking, running, and jumping.

Inside the joint, the bones are covered with a slick material called articular cartilage. Articular cartilage is the material that allows the bones to move smoothly against one another in the joints of the body. The cartilage lining is about one-quarter of an inch thick in most joints that carry body weight, such as the ankle, hip, or knee. It is soft enough to allow for shock absorption but tough enough to last a lifetime, as long as it is not injured.

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Ankle Anatomy

Rationale

What does the surgeon hope to accomplish?

The symptoms of osteoarthritis of the ankle are pain and reduced movement in the ankle joint. The pain is typically aching in nature and can make walking difficult. Certain movements may cause a grinding or catching sensation as the arthritic bone surfaces move against one another. The ankle joint may swell. This swelling is worse after heavy use at first, but as the problem grows worse the ankle may stay swollen all the time. Bone spurs, or outgrowths, may form around the edges of the joint and can also be a source of pain and swelling. The benefit of an artificial joint is to ease the symptoms of ankle osteoarthritis and provide you with a mobile joint.

Preparation

What should I do to prepare for surgery?

The decision to proceed with surgery s...

Click here to read the rest of this article from eOrthopod.com