Artificial Ankle Replacement Waupaca WI

This page provides useful content and local businesses that can help with your search for Artificial Ankle Replacement. You will find helpful, informative articles about Artificial Ankle Replacement, including "Artificial Joint Replacement of the Ankle". You will also find local businesses that provide the products or services that you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Waupaca, WI that will answer all of your questions about Artificial Ankle Replacement.

James Henry De Weerd, MD
(715) 345-5100
190 Grand Seasons Dr
Waupaca, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Bowman Gray Sch Of Med Of Wake Forest Univ, Winston-Salem Nc 27157
Graduation Year: 1972

Data Provided By:
David Michael Henneghan, MD
(715) 342-7950
190 Grand Seasons Dr
Waupaca, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Mi State Univ Coll Of Human Med, East Lansing Mi 48824
Graduation Year: 1984
Hospital
Hospital: St Michaels Hospital, Stevens Point, Wi
Group Practice: Ministry Health Care At Rice Medical Center; Rice Medical Center Ministry Health Care

Data Provided By:
Sean P Keane MD
(414) 277-1155
2015 E Newport Ave
Milwaukee, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Jan Charles Sarnecki, MD
(920) 722-9900
1516 S Commercial St
Neenah, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Mn Med Sch-Minneapolis, Minneapolis Mn 55455
Graduation Year: 1966

Data Provided By:
Robert Manz
(262) 334-3451
1700 W Paradise Dr
West Bend, WI
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Kim Harold Lulloff, MD
Waupaca, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Coll Of Wi, Milwaukee Wi 53226
Graduation Year: 1960

Data Provided By:
Dr. Rodney Lefler
Neuroscience Group of NE Wisconsin
920-725-9373 or toll free 800-201-1194
1305 W. American Drive
Neenah, WI
Specialty
Chiropractor
Conditions
Cervical spine disorders,Degenerative disc disease,Degenerative spinal conditions,Herniated disc / bulging disc,Lumbar spine disorders,Muscle pain / muscle strain,Neck pain,Sciatica / radiculopathy,Scoliosis and deformity,Spinal stenosis,Spondylolisthesis,Sports injuries,Thoracic spine disorders,Whiplash
Treatments
Exercise,McKenzie Method,Musculoskeletal manipulation,Physical therapy,Rehabilitation,Sports medicine,Strength and Conditioning
Proffesional Affiliation
Wisconsin Chiropractic Association,National Strength and Conditioning Association

John P Heiner
(608) 263-7540
600 Highland Ave
Madison, WI
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Donald Leo Wackwitz, MD
(262) 846-3444
760 Pilgrim Way
Green Bay, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Wi Med Sch, Madison Wi 53706
Graduation Year: 1979

Data Provided By:
Steven P Rhodes
(920) 261-8011
123 Hospital Dr
Watertown, WI
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Artificial Joint Replacement of the Ankle

A Patient's Guide to Artificial Joint Replacement of the Ankle

Introduction

Surgery to replace the ankle joint with an artificial joint (called ankle arthroplasty) is becoming more common. This surgery is not done as often as replacement of the knee or hip joints. Still, when necessary, this operation can reduce the pain from arthritis of the ankle. Recent advances in the design of the artificial ankle and changes in the way the operation is performed have made artificial ankle replacement a growing alternative to ankle fusion for the treatment of ankle arthritis.

This guide will help you understand

  • why artificial ankle replacement becomes necessary
  • what happens during surgery
  • what to expect after treatment

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Osteoarthritis of the Ankle

Anatomy

How does the ankle joint work?

The ankle joint is made up of three bones: the lower end of the tibia (shinbone), the fibula (the small bone of the lower leg), and the talus, the bone that fits into the socket formed by the tibia and fibula. The talus sits on top of the calcaneus (the heelbone). The talus moves mainly in one direction. It works like a hinge to allow your foot to move up and down.

Ligaments on both sides of the ankle joint help hold the bones together. Many tendons cross the ankle to move the ankle and the toes. (Ligaments connect bone to bone, while tendons connect muscle to bone.) The large Achilles tendon at the back of the ankle is the most powerful tendon in the foot. It connects the calf muscles to the heelbone and gives the foot the power for walking, running, and jumping.

Inside the joint, the bones are covered with a slick material called articular cartilage. Articular cartilage is the material that allows the bones to move smoothly against one another in the joints of the body. The cartilage lining is about one-quarter of an inch thick in most joints that carry body weight, such as the ankle, hip, or knee. It is soft enough to allow for shock absorption but tough enough to last a lifetime, as long as it is not injured.

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Ankle Anatomy

Rationale

What does the surgeon hope to accomplish?

The symptoms of osteoarthritis of the ankle are pain and reduced movement in the ankle joint. The pain is typically aching in nature and can make walking difficult. Certain movements may cause a grinding or catching sensation as the arthritic bone surfaces move against one another. The ankle joint may swell. This swelling is worse after heavy use at first, but as the problem grows worse the ankle may stay swollen all the time. Bone spurs, or outgrowths, may form around the edges of the joint and can also be a source of pain and swelling. The benefit of an artificial joint is to ease the symptoms of ankle osteoarthritis and provide you with a mobile joint.

Preparation

What should I do to prepare for surgery?

The decision to proceed with surgery s...

Click here to read the rest of this article from eOrthopod.com