Artificial Joint Replacement of the Elbow Bethel CT

Looking for information on Artificial Joint Replacement of the Elbow in Bethel? We have compiled a list of businesses and services around Bethel that should help you with your search. We hope this page helps you find information on Artificial Joint Replacement of the Elbow in Bethel.

Lawrence C Schweitzer, MD
(203) 792-5558
33 Hospital Ave
Danbury, CT
Business
Ct Family Orthopedics
Specialties
Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Depuy James
(203) 431-6515
90 Grove St
Ridgefield, CT
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Bessen Herbert
(845) 279-2828
667 Stoneleigh Ave # 124
Carmel, NY
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Passick Jeffrey
(845) 279-5550
667 Stoneleigh Ave # 302
Carmel, NY
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Langeland Rolf
(203) 337-2600
77 Kings Highway Cutoff
Fairfield, CT
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Cassels Christopher
(203) 431-6515
90 Grove St
Ridgefield, CT
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Chang Winshih
(845) 279-2170
Route 22
Brewster, NY
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Buchalter Joel
(914) 276-3800
Route 100
Somers, NY
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Bernstein Michael Louis
(845) 279-5550
667 Stoneleigh Ave # 302
Carmel, NY
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Blechner Mark
(203) 337-2600
75 Kings Highway Cutoff
Fairfield, CT
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Artificial Joint Replacement of the Elbow

A Patient's Guide to Artificial Joint Replacement of the Elbow

Introduction

Elbow joint replacement (also called elbow arthroplasty) can effectively treat the problems caused by arthritis of the elbow. The procedure is also becoming more widely used in aging adults to replace joints damaged by fractures. The artificial elbow is considered successful by more than 90 percent of patients who have elbow joint replacement.

This guide will help you understand

  • how the elbow joint works
  • what happens during surgery to replace the elbow joint
  • what you can expect after elbow joint replacement

Anatomy

How does the elbow joint work?

The elbow joint is made up of three bones : the humerus bone of the upper arm, and the ulna and radius bones of the forearm.

The ulna and the humerus meet at the elbow and form a hinge. This hinge allows the arm to straighten and bend. The large triceps muscle in the back of the arm attaches to the point of the ulna (the olecranon). When this muscle contracts, it straightens out the elbow. The biceps muscles in the front of the arm contracts to bend the elbow.

Inside the elbow joint, the bones are covered with articular cartilage. Articular cartilage is a slick, smooth material. It protects the bone ends from friction when they rub together as the elbow moves. Articular cartilage is soft enough to act as a shock absorber. It is also tough enough to last a lifetime, if it is not injured.

The connection of the radius to the humerus allows rotation of the forearm. The upper end of the radius is round. This round end turns against the ulna and the humerus as the forearm and hand turn from palm down (pronation) to palm up supination).

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Elbow Anatomy

Rationale

What makes elbow joint replacement surgery necessary?

A joint replacement surgery is usually considered a last resort for a badly damaged and painful elbow joint. The artificial joint replaces the damaged surfaces with metal and plastic that are designed to fit together and rub smoothly against each other. This takes away the pain of bone rubbing against bone.

The most common reason for an artificial elbow replacement is arthritis. There are two main types of arthritis, degenerative and systemic. Degenerative arthritis is also called wear-and-tear arthritis, or osteoarthritis. Any injury to the elbow can damage the joint and lead to degenerative arthritis. Arthritis may not show up for many years after the injury.

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Osteoarthritis

There are many types of systemic arthritis. The most common form is rheumatoid arthritis. All types of systemic arthritis are diseases that affect many, or even all, of the joints in the body. Systemic arthritis causes destruction of the joints' articular cartilage lining.

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Arthritis

An elbow joint replacement may also be used imm...

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