Artificial Joint Replacement of the Knee Cheyenne WY

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Dr.W. Carlton Reckling
(307) 632-6637
800 East 20th St # 300
Cheyenne, WY
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Creighton Univ Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1989
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
4.1, out of 5 based on 10, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Duane M Kline, MD
(307) 632-3694
2812 Pine Dr
Cheyenne, WY
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ks Sch Of Med, Kansas City Ks 66103
Graduation Year: 1946

Data Provided By:
W Carlton Reckling, MD
(307) 632-6637
800 E 20th St Ste 300
Cheyenne, WY
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Creighton Univ Sch Of Med, Omaha Ne 68178
Graduation Year: 1989

Data Provided By:
Mark Richard Rangitsch, MD
(307) 632-9261
2301 House Ave
Cheyenne, WY
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Creighton Univ Sch Of Med, Omaha Ne 68178
Graduation Year: 1989

Data Provided By:
W Reckling
(307) 632-6637
800 E 20th St
Cheyenne, WY
Specialty
Orthopaedic Surgery of the Spine

Data Provided By:
Michael Pete Kuhn
(307) 778-0922
5307 Yellowstone Rd
Cheyenne, WY
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Richard Eugene Torkelson
(307) 632-9261
2301 House Ave
Cheyenne, WY
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Timothy C Lindquist
(307) 778-7547
2360 E Pershing Blvd
Cheyenne, WY
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Thomas John Gasser, MD
(307) 634-0871
6020 Yellowstone Rd
Cheyenne, WY
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Wi Med Sch, Madison Wi 53706
Graduation Year: 1969

Data Provided By:
Jason L Bird, DDS
(307) 632-8090
1401 Airport Prkwy Ste 140
Cheyenne, WY
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Artificial Joint Replacement of the Knee

A Patient's Guide to Artificial Joint Replacement of the Knee

Introduction

A painful knee can severely affect your ability to lead a full, active life. Over the last 25 years, major advancements in artificial knee replacement have improved the outcome of the surgery greatly. Artificial knee replacement surgery (also called knee arthroplasty) is becoming increasingly common as the population of the world begins to age.

This guide will help you understand

  • what your surgeon hopes to achieve with knee replacement surgery
  • what happens during the procedure
  • what to expect after your operation

Anatomy

What is the normal anatomy of the knee?

The knee joint is formed where the thighbone (femur) meets the shinbone (tibia). A smooth cushion of articular cartilage covers the end surfaces of both of these bones so that they slide against one another smoothly. The articular cartilage is kept slippery by joint fluid made by the joint lining (synovial membrane). The fluid is contained in a soft tissue enclosure around the knee joint called the joint capsule.

The patella, or kneecap, is the moveable bone on the front of the knee. It is wrapped inside a tendon that connects the large muscles on the front of the thigh, the quadriceps muscles, to the lower leg bone. The surface on the back of the patella is covered with articular cartilage. It glides within a groove on the front of the femur.

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Knee Anatomy

Rationale

What does the surgeon hope to achieve?

The main reason for replacing any arthritic joint with an artificial joint is to stop the bones from rubbing against each other. This rubbing causes pain. Replacing the painful and arthritic joint with an artificial joint gives the joint a new surface, which moves smoothly and without causing pain. The goal is to help people return to many of their activities with less pain and with greater freedom of movement.

Preparation

How should I prepare for surgery?

The decision to proceed with surgery should be made jointly by you and your surgeon. The decision should only be made after you feel that you understand as much about the procedure as possible.

Once you decide to proceed with surgery, several things may need to be done. Your orthopedic surgeon may suggest a complete physical examination by your regular doctor. This is to ensure that you are in the best possible condition to undergo the operation. You may also need to spend time with the physical therapist who will be managing your rehabilitation after the surgery. The therapist will begin the teaching process before surgery to ensure that you are ready for rehabilitation afterwards.

One purpose of the preoperative visit is to record a baseline of information. This includes measurements of your current pain levels, functional abilities, the presence of swelling, and the available movement and strength of each knee.

A second purpose of the preopera...

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