Artificial Joint Replacement of the Shoulder Bethel CT

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Lawrence C Schweitzer, MD
(203) 792-5558
33 Hospital Ave
Danbury, CT
Business
Ct Family Orthopedics
Specialties
Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Depuy James
(203) 431-6515
90 Grove St
Ridgefield, CT
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Buchalter Joel
(914) 276-3800
Route 100
Somers, NY
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Bernstein Michael Louis
(845) 279-5550
667 Stoneleigh Ave # 302
Carmel, NY
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Langeland Rolf
(203) 337-2600
77 Kings Highway Cutoff
Fairfield, CT
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Cassels Christopher
(203) 431-6515
90 Grove St
Ridgefield, CT
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Chang Winshih
(845) 279-2170
Route 22
Brewster, NY
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Bessen Herbert
(845) 279-2828
667 Stoneleigh Ave # 124
Carmel, NY
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Passick Jeffrey
(845) 279-5550
667 Stoneleigh Ave # 302
Carmel, NY
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Brittis Dante
(203) 337-2600
75 Kings Highway Cutoff
Fairfield, CT
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: No
Workmens Comp Accepted: No
Accepts Uninsured Patients: No
Emergency Care: No


Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Artificial Joint Replacement of the Shoulder

A Patient's Guide to Artificial Joint Replacement of the Shoulder

Introduction

Shoulder joint replacement surgery (also called shoulder arthroplasty) is not as common as replacement surgeries for the knee or hip joints. Still, when necessary, this operation can effectively ease pain from shoulder arthritis. Most people experience improved shoulder function after this surgery.

This guide will help you understand

  • how the shoulder works
  • what parts of the shoulder are replaced in surgery
  • what to expect after shoulder replacement surgery

Anatomy

What parts make up the shoulder?

The shoulder is made up of three bones: the scapula (shoulder blade), the humerus (upper arm bone), and the clavicle (collarbone).

The rotator cuff connects the humerus to the scapula. The rotator cuff is formed by the tendons of four muscles: the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis.

Tendons attach muscles to bones. Muscles move bones by pulling on the tendons. The rotator cuff helps raise and rotate the arm. As the arm is raised, the rotator cuff also keeps the humerus tightly in the socket. A part of the scapula, called the glenoid, makes up the socket of the shoulder. The glenoid is very shallow and flat.

The part of the scapula that connects to the shoulder is called the acromion. A bursa is located between the acromion and the rotator cuff tendons. A bursa is a lubricated sac of tissue that cuts down on the friction between two moving parts. Bursae are located all over the body where tissues must rub against each other. In this case, the bursa protects the acromion and the rotator cuff from grinding against each other.

The humeral head of the shoulder is the ball portion of the joint. The humeral head has several blood vessels, which enter at the base of the articular cartilage. Articular cartilage is the smooth, white material that covers the ends of bones in most joints. Articular cartilage provides a slick, rubbery surface that allows the bones to glide over each other as they move. Cartilage also functions as sort of a shock absorber.

The shoulder joint is surrounded by a watertight sac called the joint capsule. The joint capsule holds fluids that lubricate the joint. The walls of the joint capsule are made up of ligaments. Ligaments are connective tissues that attach bones to bones. The joint capsule has a considerable amount of slack, loose tissue, so that the shoulder is unrestricted as it moves through its large range of motion.

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Shoulder Anatomy

Rationale

What conditions lead to shoulder joint replacement?

The most common reason for undergoing shoulder replacement surgery is osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is caused by the degeneration of the joint over time, through wear and tear. Osteoarthritis can occur without any injury to the shoulder, but that is uncommon. Because the shoulder is not a weight-bear...

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