Artificial Joint Replacement of the Shoulder Grand Forks ND

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John O Nord, DDS
(701) 775-0684
2650 32nd Ave S
Grand Forks, ND
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Robert H Clayburgh
(701) 746-7521
3035 Demers Ave
Grand Forks, ND
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
David M Schall, MD
(701) 746-7521
3035 Demers Ave
Grand Forks, ND
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Nd Sch Of Med, Grand Forks Nd 58201
Graduation Year: 1997

Data Provided By:
Robert A Johnson
(701) 780-6000
1000 S Columbia Rd
Grand Forks, ND
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
James E Gjerset, DDS
(701) 772-4835
1165 S Columbia Rd STE A
Grand Forks, ND
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Brian Thomas Briggs, MD
(701) 775-5244
2617 S Columbia Rd
Grand Forks, ND
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Saskatchewan, Coll Of Med, Saskatoon, Sask, Canada
Graduation Year: 1974

Data Provided By:
Joff Garfield Thompson, MD
(701) 746-7521
3035 Demers Ave
Grand Forks, ND
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Duke Univ Sch Of Med, Durham Nc 27710
Graduation Year: 1994

Data Provided By:
Dr.David Rathbone
(701) 780-6000
1300 South Columbia Road
Grand Forks, ND
Gender
M
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
4.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Robert Henry Clayburgh, MD
(701) 780-6777
3035 Demers Ave
Grand Forks, ND
Specialties
Orthopedics, Hand Surgery
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Washington Univ Sch Of Med, St Louis Mo 63110
Graduation Year: 1978
Hospital
Hospital: Altru Hosp, Grand Forks, Nd; Mercy Home Care, Devils Lake, Nd
Group Practice: Diabetes Center

Data Provided By:
Robert Alan Johnson, MD
(701) 775-8309
PO Box 6003
Grand Forks, ND
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Nd Sch Of Med, Grand Forks Nd 58201
Graduation Year: 1976

Data Provided By:
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Artificial Joint Replacement of the Shoulder

A Patient's Guide to Artificial Joint Replacement of the Shoulder

Introduction

Shoulder joint replacement surgery (also called shoulder arthroplasty) is not as common as replacement surgeries for the knee or hip joints. Still, when necessary, this operation can effectively ease pain from shoulder arthritis. Most people experience improved shoulder function after this surgery.

This guide will help you understand

  • how the shoulder works
  • what parts of the shoulder are replaced in surgery
  • what to expect after shoulder replacement surgery

Anatomy

What parts make up the shoulder?

The shoulder is made up of three bones: the scapula (shoulder blade), the humerus (upper arm bone), and the clavicle (collarbone).

The rotator cuff connects the humerus to the scapula. The rotator cuff is formed by the tendons of four muscles: the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis.

Tendons attach muscles to bones. Muscles move bones by pulling on the tendons. The rotator cuff helps raise and rotate the arm. As the arm is raised, the rotator cuff also keeps the humerus tightly in the socket. A part of the scapula, called the glenoid, makes up the socket of the shoulder. The glenoid is very shallow and flat.

The part of the scapula that connects to the shoulder is called the acromion. A bursa is located between the acromion and the rotator cuff tendons. A bursa is a lubricated sac of tissue that cuts down on the friction between two moving parts. Bursae are located all over the body where tissues must rub against each other. In this case, the bursa protects the acromion and the rotator cuff from grinding against each other.

The humeral head of the shoulder is the ball portion of the joint. The humeral head has several blood vessels, which enter at the base of the articular cartilage. Articular cartilage is the smooth, white material that covers the ends of bones in most joints. Articular cartilage provides a slick, rubbery surface that allows the bones to glide over each other as they move. Cartilage also functions as sort of a shock absorber.

The shoulder joint is surrounded by a watertight sac called the joint capsule. The joint capsule holds fluids that lubricate the joint. The walls of the joint capsule are made up of ligaments. Ligaments are connective tissues that attach bones to bones. The joint capsule has a considerable amount of slack, loose tissue, so that the shoulder is unrestricted as it moves through its large range of motion.

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Shoulder Anatomy

Rationale

What conditions lead to shoulder joint replacement?

The most common reason for undergoing shoulder replacement surgery is osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is caused by the degeneration of the joint over time, through wear and tear. Osteoarthritis can occur without any injury to the shoulder, but that is uncommon. Because the shoulder is not a weight-bear...

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