Artificial Joint Replacement of the Shoulder Nampa ID

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T Clark Robinson
(208) 288-4970
4400 E Flamingo Ave
Nampa, ID
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Miers C Johnson III, MD
(208) 463-3000
215 E Hawaii Ave
Nampa, ID
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Hahnemann Univ Sch Of Med, Philadelphia Pa 19102
Graduation Year: 1979
Hospital
Hospital: Mercy Med Ctr, Nampa, Id; St Lukes Reg Medctr, Boise, Id
Group Practice: Saltzer Medical Group Pa

Data Provided By:
Shane A Andrew
(208) 468-5940
215 E Hawaii Ave
Nampa, ID
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Christian Cusimano, DDS
(208) 467-4362
345 W Iowa Ave
Nampa, ID
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Jeffrey Norman Hansen, MD
(406) 245-5688
215 E Hawaii Ave
Nampa, ID
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Wa Sch Of Med, Seattle Wa 98195
Graduation Year: 1980

Data Provided By:
Ercil Ray Bowman, MD
(360) 385-7589
2923 Sioux St
Nampa, ID
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Northwestern Univ Med Sch, Chicago Il 60611
Graduation Year: 1955

Data Provided By:
Dr.Gary Bottimer
215 East Hawaii Avenue
Nampa, ID
Gender
M
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Hospital: Mercy Mecical Center
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 3, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Miers C Johnson
(208) 468-5940
215 E Hawaii Ave
Nampa, ID
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Gary David Botimer, MD
208-463-3000ext3305
13753 Locust Ln
Nampa, ID
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Loma Linda Univ Sch Of Med, Loma Linda Ca 92350
Graduation Year: 1980

Data Provided By:
Fred H Helpenstell, MD
(208) 466-0536
11302 Coyote Cv
Nampa, ID
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Artificial Joint Replacement of the Shoulder

A Patient's Guide to Artificial Joint Replacement of the Shoulder

Introduction

Shoulder joint replacement surgery (also called shoulder arthroplasty) is not as common as replacement surgeries for the knee or hip joints. Still, when necessary, this operation can effectively ease pain from shoulder arthritis. Most people experience improved shoulder function after this surgery.

This guide will help you understand

  • how the shoulder works
  • what parts of the shoulder are replaced in surgery
  • what to expect after shoulder replacement surgery

Anatomy

What parts make up the shoulder?

The shoulder is made up of three bones: the scapula (shoulder blade), the humerus (upper arm bone), and the clavicle (collarbone).

The rotator cuff connects the humerus to the scapula. The rotator cuff is formed by the tendons of four muscles: the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis.

Tendons attach muscles to bones. Muscles move bones by pulling on the tendons. The rotator cuff helps raise and rotate the arm. As the arm is raised, the rotator cuff also keeps the humerus tightly in the socket. A part of the scapula, called the glenoid, makes up the socket of the shoulder. The glenoid is very shallow and flat.

The part of the scapula that connects to the shoulder is called the acromion. A bursa is located between the acromion and the rotator cuff tendons. A bursa is a lubricated sac of tissue that cuts down on the friction between two moving parts. Bursae are located all over the body where tissues must rub against each other. In this case, the bursa protects the acromion and the rotator cuff from grinding against each other.

The humeral head of the shoulder is the ball portion of the joint. The humeral head has several blood vessels, which enter at the base of the articular cartilage. Articular cartilage is the smooth, white material that covers the ends of bones in most joints. Articular cartilage provides a slick, rubbery surface that allows the bones to glide over each other as they move. Cartilage also functions as sort of a shock absorber.

The shoulder joint is surrounded by a watertight sac called the joint capsule. The joint capsule holds fluids that lubricate the joint. The walls of the joint capsule are made up of ligaments. Ligaments are connective tissues that attach bones to bones. The joint capsule has a considerable amount of slack, loose tissue, so that the shoulder is unrestricted as it moves through its large range of motion.

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Shoulder Anatomy

Rationale

What conditions lead to shoulder joint replacement?

The most common reason for undergoing shoulder replacement surgery is osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis is caused by the degeneration of the joint over time, through wear and tear. Osteoarthritis can occur without any injury to the shoulder, but that is uncommon. Because the shoulder is not a weight-bear...

Click here to read the rest of this article from eOrthopod.com