Artificial Joint Replacement of the Wrist Greensboro NC

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Daniel F Murphy, MD
(336) 375-2300
1130 N Church St
Greensboro, NC
Business
Murphy & Wainer Orthopaedics
Specialties
Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Marcus Valentine Duda, MD
(336) 275-0927
300 W Northwood St
Greensboro, NC
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Bowman Gray Sch Of Med Of Wake Forest Univ, Winston-Salem Nc 27157
Graduation Year: 1991

Data Provided By:
Anna Voytek, MD
Greensboro, NC
Specialty
Orthopaedic Sugeon

Data Provided By:
Samuel A Sue, MD FACS
(336) 545-5000
PO Box 38008
Greensboro, NC
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Bowman Gray
Graduation Year: 1956

Data Provided By:
Anna Voytek
(336) 375-2300
1130 N Church St
Greensboro, NC
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Rodney Allen Mortenson, MD
(336) 275-6318
201 E Wendover Ave
Greensboro, NC
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Southern Ca Sch Of Med, Los Angeles Ca 90033
Graduation Year: 1967

Data Provided By:
Elizabeth M Meyerdierks, MD
(336) 275-0927
300 W Northwood St
Greensboro, NC
Specialties
Orthopedics, Hand Surgery
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Tulane Univ Sch Of Med, New Orleans La 70112
Graduation Year: 1981

Data Provided By:
Peter W Whitfield
(336) 275-6318
201 E Wendover Ave
Greensboro, NC
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Max W Cohen
(336) 333-6306
1002 N Church St
Greensboro, NC
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery, Orthopaedic Surgery of the Spine

Data Provided By:
Mark Charles Yates, MD
(336) 275-0927
300 W Northwood St
Greensboro, NC
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Mo-Kansas City Sch Of Med, Kansas City Mo 64108
Graduation Year: 1982
Hospital
Hospital: Moses H Cone Memorial Hospital, Greensboro, Nc
Group Practice: Piedmont Orthopedic Assoc Inc

Data Provided By:
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Artificial Joint Replacement of the Wrist

A Patient's Guide to Artificial Joint Replacement of the Wrist

Introduction

The wrist joint is replaced with an artificial joint (also called a prosthesis) much less often than other joints in the body, such as the knee or the hip. Still, when necessary, this operation can effectively relieve the pain caused by wrist arthritis. When severe arthritis has destroyed the wrist joint, artificial wrist replacement surgery (also called wrist arthroplasty) can help restore wrist strength and motion for many patients.

This guide will help you understand

  • how the wrist is constructed
  • what parts of the wrist are replaced
  • what to expect after surgery

Anatomy

What parts of the wrist are involved?

The anatomy of the wrist joint is extremely complex, probably the most complex of all the joints in the body. The wrist joint is actually made up of many joints and many bones. These joints and bones let us use our hands in many ways. The wrist must be extremely mobile to give our hands a full range of motion. At the same time, the wrist must provide the strength for heavy gripping.

The wrist is made up of eight separate small bones, called the carpal bones. The carpal bones connect the two bones of the forearm, the radius and the ulna, to the bones of the hand. The metacarpal bones are the long bones that lie mostly underneath the palm. The metacarpals are in turn attached to the phalanges (the bones in the fingers and thumb).

One reason that the wrist is so complex is that every small bone forms a joint with the bone next to it. This means many small joints make up the wrist joint. Ligaments connect all the small bones to each other, and to the radius, ulna, and metacarpal bones.

Articular cartilage is the smooth, rubbery material that covers the bone surfaces in most joints. It protects the bone ends from friction when they rub together as the joint moves. Articular cartilage also acts sort of like a shock absorber. Damage to the articular cartilage eventually leads to degenerative arthritis.

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Osteoarthritis of the Wrist Joint

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Wrist Anatomy

Rationale

What conditions lead to wrist joint replacement?

The main reason for replacing any arthritic joint with an artificial joint is to stop the bones from rubbing against each other. This rubbing causes pain. Replacing the painful arthritic joint with an artificial joint gives the joint a new surface, which lets it move smoothly without causing pain.

Many operations are used to treat problems in the wrist. A fusion surgery can get rid of pain and restore strength in badly degenerated wrist joints. Fusion surgeries make the wrist strong again, but they greatly reduce the wrist's range of motion. This makes fusion surgery a poor choice for some people.

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Wrist Fusion

Arthritis caused by systemic diseases, such as rheumatoid a...

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