Biceps Tendonitis River Falls WI

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Gregory K Ross, DDS
(651) 501-1467
2165 White Bear Ave N
Lakeland, MN
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Gregg G Hipple, DDS
(651) 459-6674
7729 79th St S
Cottage Grove, MN
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Jon Craig Paulson, MD
(651) 439-8807
10245 Fox Run Rd
Saint Paul, MN
Specialties
Orthopedics, Hand Surgery
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Mn Med Sch-Minneapolis, Minneapolis Mn 55455
Graduation Year: 1974

Data Provided By:
Abdul Hamid Khan, MD
(715) 246-2251
1390 Hilltop Rdg
Houlton, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Mgm Med Coll, Devi Ahilya Vishwavidhyalaya, Indore, Mp, India
Graduation Year: 1964

Data Provided By:
Steven J Henseler, DDS
(651) 739-1555
1000 Radio Dr Ste 220
Saint Paul, MN
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Mary L Sedivy, DDS
(651) 459-6674
7729 79th St S
Cottage Grove, MN
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Jerome John Perra, MD
(651) 842-5412
Hastings, MN
Specialties
Orthopedics, General Surgery
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Mn Med Sch-Minneapolis, Minneapolis Mn 55455
Graduation Year: 1985
Hospital
Hospital: Dickinson County Mem Hosp, Spirit Lake, Ia
Group Practice: Iowa Lakes Orthpedic

Data Provided By:
M Hamid Ali Khan, MD FACS
1390 Hilltop Rdg
Houlton, WI
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Osmania
Graduation Year: 1960

Data Provided By:
Jerome Perra
(651) 842-5412
1285 Nininger Rd
Hastings, MN
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Mark Thomas Dahl, MD
(651) 439-8807
1991 Northwestern Ave S
Stillwater, MN
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Mayo Med Sch, Rochester Mn 55905
Graduation Year: 1980

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Biceps Tendonitis

A Patient's Guide to Biceps Tendonitis

Introduction

Biceps tendonitis, also called bicipital tendonitis, is inflammation in the main tendon that attaches the top of the biceps muscle to the shoulder. The most common cause is overuse from certain types of work or sports activities. Biceps tendonitis may develop gradually from the effects of wear and tear, or it can happen suddenly from a direct injury. The tendon may also become inflamed in response to other problems in the shoulder, such as rotator cuff tears, impingement, or instability (described below).

This guide will help you understand

  • what parts of the shoulder are affected
  • the causes of biceps tendonitis
  • ways to treat this problem

Anatomy

What parts of the shoulder are affected?

The biceps muscle goes from the shoulder to the elbow on the front of the upper arm. Two separate tendons (tendons attach muscles to bones) connect the upper part of the biceps muscle to the shoulder. The upper two tendons of the biceps are called the proximal biceps tendons, because they are closer to the top of the arm.

The main proximal tendon is the long head of the biceps. It connects the biceps muscle to the top of the shoulder socket, the glenoid. It also blends with the cartilage rim around the glenoid, the labrum. The labrum is a rim of soft tissue that turns the flat surface of the glenoid into a deeper socket. This arrangement improves the fit of the ball that fits in the socket, the humeral head.

Beginning at the top of the glenoid, the tendon of the long head of the biceps runs in front of the humeral head. The tendon passes within the bicipital groove of the humerus and is held in place by the transverse humeral ligament. This arrangement keeps the humeral head from sliding too far up or forward within the glenoid.

The short head of the biceps connects on the coracoid process of the scapula (shoulder blade). The coracoid process is a small bony knob just in from the front of the shoulder. The lower biceps tendon is called the distal biceps tendon. The word distal means the tendon is further down the arm. The lower part of the biceps muscle connects to the elbow by this tendon. The muscles forming the short and long heads of the biceps stay separate until just above the elbow, where they unite and connect to the distal biceps tendon.

Tendons are made up of strands of a material called collagen. The collagen strands are lined up in bundles next to each other. Because the collagen strands in tendons are lined up, tendons have high tensile strength. This means they can withstand high forces that pull on both ends of the tendon. When muscles work, they pull on one end of the tendon. The other end of the tendon pulls on the bone, causing the bone to move.

Contracting the biceps muscle can bend the elbow upward. The biceps can also help flex the shoulder, lifting the arm up, a movement called flexion. And the ...

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