Cervical Artificial Disc Replacement Milledgeville GA

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Mark Lewis Mudano, MD
(478) 451-0200
541 W Montgomery St Ste 1
Milledgeville, GA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Coll Of Ga Sch Of Med, Augusta Ga 30912
Graduation Year: 1984

Data Provided By:
Steven P Niergarth, DO
(478) 451-0040
1201 N Columbia Dr
Milledgeville, GA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Mi State Univ, Coll Of Osteo Med, East Lansing Mi 48824
Graduation Year: 1985

Data Provided By:
Akin Omitowoju, MD
2955 N Columbia St
Milledgeville, GA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Lagos, Coll Of Med, Lagos, Nigeria
Graduation Year: 1972

Data Provided By:
Clarence Hughes Fossier, MD
(478) 457-0037
PO Box 750
Milledgeville, GA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Il Coll Of Med, Chicago Il 60680
Graduation Year: 1966

Data Provided By:
Sami O. Khan, M.D.
(770) 491-3003
2680 Lawrencevill Highway
Decatur, GA
Business
Resrugens Orthopaedics
Specialties
Orthopedics, Arthroscopic and Reconstructive Surgery of the Shoulder, Elbow and Knee, Sports Medicine, General Orthopaedics
Insurance
Insurance Plans Accepted: We accept most insurance plans

Doctor Information
Primary Hospital: Emory Eastside Hospital
Residency Training: New York University Hospital fo rJoint Disease
Medical School: Emory University School of Medicine,
Additional Information
Member Organizations: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Arthroscopy Association of North America, American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine
Awards: Associate Team Physician, New York Mets MLB 2003-2004 Team Physician, Mississippi Valley State Delta Devils 2006-2007 Associate Physician, Alvin Ailey Dance Theater New York, 2004 Author of multiple textbook chapters involving shoulder and elbow injuri
Languages Spoken: English,Spanish

Data Provided By:
Pedro Luis Tamayo, MD
(478) 452-8096
Milledgeville, GA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Inst Sup De Cien Med De La Habana, La Habana, Cuba
Graduation Year: 1959

Data Provided By:
John Hopkins Ferguson, DDS
(478) 453-3445
600 N Cobb ST PO Box 850
Milledgeville, GA
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Anne T Sanchez, DMD
(478) 452-7441
1006 Fernwood Dr
Milledgeville, GA
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Lawrence A. Bircoll, M.D.
(770) 491-3003
2680 Lawrenceville Highway
Decatur, GA
Business
Resurgens Orthopedics
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Insurance Plans Accepted: We accept most insurance plans

Doctor Information
Primary Hospital: Dekalb Medical Center
Residency Training: Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan
Medical School: University of Michigan School of Medicine,
Additional Information
Member Organizations: American Academy of Orthopaedics Medical Association of Georgia Atlanta Orthoapedic Society
Languages Spoken: English

Data Provided By:
Robert J. Morgan, M.D.
(770) 787-4042
3211 Iris drive
Covington, GA
Business
Resurgens Orthopaedics
Specialties
Orthopedics, Sports Medicine, Shoulder & Elbow Surgery, Knee Ligament Reconstruction & Cartilage Repair, General Orthopaedics
Insurance
Insurance Plans Accepted: Accept most insurance plans

Doctor Information
Primary Hospital: Rockdale Medical Center
Residency Training: Carolinas Medical Center; Charlotte, North Carolina
Medical School: Medical University of South Carolina; Charleston, South Carolina,
Additional Information
Member Organizations: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy Association of North America
Languages Spoken: English

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Cervical Artificial Disc Replacement

A Patient's Guide to Cervical Artificial Disc Replacement

Introduction

Artificial disc replacement (ADR) is relatively new. In June 2004, the first ADR for the lumbar spine (low back) was approved by the FDA for use in the US. Replacing a damaged disc in the cervical spine (neck) is a bit trickier. The disc is part of a complex joint in the spine. Making a replacement disc that works and that will last is not an easy task. There are now several Cervical artificial disc replacement devices that have been approved by the FDA for use in the United States.

The artificial disc is inserted in the space between two vertebrae. The goal is to replace the diseased or damaged disc while keeping your normal neck motion. The hope is that your spine will be protected from similar problems above and below the affected spinal level.

This guide will help you understand:

  • what parts of the spine are involved
  • what your surgeon hopes to achieve
  • who can benefit from this procedure
  • how do I prepare for surgery
  • what happens during the procedure
  • what to expect as you recover

Anatomy

What parts of the spine are involved?

Disc replacement typically occurs at cervical spine levels C4-5, C5-6, or C6-7. The first seven vertebrae make up the cervical spine. Doctors often refer to the cervical vertebrae as C1 to C7. The cervical spine starts where the top vertebra (C1) connects to the bottom of the skull. The cervical spine curves slightly inward and ends where C7 joins the top of the thoracic spine (the chest area) at the first thoracic vertebra, T1.

Each vertebra is made of the same parts. The main section of each cervical vertebrae, from C2 to C7, is formed by a round block of bone, called the vertebral body. A bony ring attaches to the back of the vertebral body. This ring has two parts. Two pedicles connect directly to the back of the vertebral body. Two lamina bones join the pedicles to complete the ring. The lamina bones form the outer rim of the bony ring. When the vertebrae are stacked on top of each other, the bony rings form a hollow tube that surrounds the spinal cord. The laminae provide a protective wall around the spinal cord.

On the left and right side of each vertebra is a small tunnel called a neural foramen. (Foramina is the plural term.) The two nerves that leave the spine at each vertebra go through the foramina, one on the left and one on the right. The intervertebral disc sits directly in front of the opening. A bulged or herniated disc can narrow the opening and put pressure on the nerve. A facet joint sits behind the foramen. Bone spurs that form on the facet joint can project into the tunnel, narrowing the hole and pinching the nerve.

A special type of structure in the spine called an intervertebral disc has two parts. The center, called the nucleus, is spongy. It provides most of the shock absorption in the spine. The nucleus is held in place by the annulus, a serie...

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