Cervical Laminectomy Easley SC

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Jon R Davids, MD
(864) 271-3444
950 W Faris Rd
Greenville, SC
Business
Shriner's Hospital
Specialties
Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Daniel Eaton Lee, MD
(864) 855-9235
403 Hillcrest Dr Ste A
Easley, SC
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Univ Of Sc Coll Of Med, Charleston Sc 29425
Graduation Year: 1988
Hospital
Hospital: Baptist Med Ctr -Easley, Easley, Sc
Group Practice: Foothills Orthopaedic & Sports

Data Provided By:
David Motte Mc Innis, DDS
(864) 859-1676
411 S Pendleton St
Easley, SC
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Steven Lee Martin, MD
121 Harrison Rd
Easley, SC
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Va Commonwealth Univ, Med Coll Of Va Sch Of Med, Richmond Va 23298
Graduation Year: 1984

Data Provided By:
Mark James Wasylenko
(864) 855-1633
115 Brushy Creek Rd
Easley, SC
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Robert Felix Finley, MD
(864) 855-4431
704 N A St
Easley, SC
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Univ Of Sc Coll Of Med, Charleston Sc 29425
Graduation Year: 1976

Data Provided By:
J Thomas Dean, DDS
(864) 859-1676
411 S Pendleton St
Easley, SC
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Dr.Mark J.. Wasylenko
(864) 855-1633
115 Brushy Creek Road
Easley, SC
Gender
M
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Hospital: Easley Baptist/Cannon Memorial
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
4.1, out of 5 based on 7, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Mark J Wasylenko, MD
(864) 855-1633
115 Brushy Creek Rd
Easley, SC
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Saskatchewan, Coll Of Med, Saskatoon, Sask, Canada
Graduation Year: 1975

Data Provided By:
John S Disher, DMD
(864) 246-8200
1601 Cedar Lane Rd
Greenville, SC
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
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Cervical Laminectomy

A Patient's Guide to Cervical Laminectomy

Introduction

A laminectomy is a surgical procedure to relieve pressure on the spinal cord due to spinal stenosis. In spinal stenosis, bone spurs press against the spinal cord, leading to a condition called myelopathy. Myelopathy can produce problems with the bowels and bladder, disruptions in the way you walk, and impairments with fine motor skills in the hands. In a laminectomy, a small section of bone covering the back of the spinal cord is removed. Lamina refers to the roof of bone over the back of the spinal cord, and ectomy means the medical procedure for removing a section of the bony roof to take pressure off the spinal cord.

This guide will help you understand

  • why the procedure becomes necessary
  • what surgeons hope to achieve
  • what to expect during your recovery

Anatomy

What parts of the neck are involved?

Surgeons perform this procedure through the back of the neck. This is known as the posterior neck region. It includes the parts that make up the bony ring around the spinal cord (the pedicles and laminae.)

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Cervical Spine Anatomy

Rationale

What do surgeons hope to achieve?

View animation of disc collapse

A laminectomy can alleviate the symptoms of spinal stenosis, a condition that causes the spinal cord to become compressed inside the spinal canal. Wear and tear on the spine from aging and from repeated stresses and strains can cause a spinal disc to begin to collapse. This is the first stage of spinal stenosis. As the space between the vertebrae narrows, the posterior longitudinal ligament that attaches behind the vertebral body may buckle and push against the spinal cord. The degenerative process can also cause bone spurs to develop. When these spurs point into the spinal canal, they squeeze the spinal cord. In a laminectomy, the surgeon removes a section of the lamina bone, the buckled parts of the posterior longitudinal ligament, and the bone spurs, taking pressure off the spinal cord.

Preparation

How will I prepare for surgery?

The decision to proceed with surgery must be made jointly by you and your surgeon. You should understand as much about the procedure as possible. If you have concerns or questions, you should talk to your surgeon.

Once you decide on surgery, your surgeon may suggest a complete physical examination by your regular doctor. This exam helps ensure that you are in the best possible condition to undergo the operation.

On the day of your surgery, you will probably be admitted to the hospital early in the morning. You shouldn't eat or drink anything after midnight the night before.

Surgical Procedure

What happens during the operation?

Patients are given a general anesthesia to put them to sleep during most spine surgeries. As you sleep, your breathing may be assisted with a ventilator. A ventilator is a device that controls and monitors the flo...

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