Cervical Laminectomy Wichita KS

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Kenneth Jansson
(316) 631-1600
2778 N Webb Rd
Wichita, KS
Business
Advanced Orthopaedics Associates
Specialties
Orthopedics, Sports Medicine, Arthroscopic Surgery
Insurance
Insurance Plans Accepted: Almost all insurance plans accepted.
Medicare Accepted: Yes
Workmens Comp Accepted: Yes
Accepts Uninsured Patients: Yes

Doctor Information
Primary Hospital: Kansas Surgery and Recovery Center; Surgicare of Wichita
Residency Training: Wilford Hall USAF Medical Center, Lackland AFB, TX
Medical School: Darthmouth, 1982
Additional Information
Member Organizations: American College of Sports Medicine American Medical Association American Medical Society for Sports Medicine American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Arthroscopy Association of North America Fellow American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeo


Data Provided By:
Samuel C Jack, MD FACS
2121 W Maple St
Wichita, KS
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Oklahoma
Graduation Year: 1955

Data Provided By:
James Scott Pigg
(316) 268-5000
1010 N Kansas St
Wichita, KS
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Bradley Robert Dart, MD
(316) 268-5988
1231 N Coolidge Ave
Wichita, KS
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ks Sch Of Med, Kansas City Ks 66103
Graduation Year: 2001

Data Provided By:
Gregory Paul Ballard, MD
(316) 268-5988
929 N Saint Francis St
Wichita, KS
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ks Sch Of Med, Kansas City Ks 66103
Graduation Year: 2000

Data Provided By:
Suhail Akhter Ansari, MD
(413) 221-3078
517 E Douglas Ave Apt 501
Wichita, KS
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Grant Med Coll, Univ Of Bombay, Bombay, Maharashtra, India
Graduation Year: 1983
Hospital
Hospital: Southwest Med Ctr, Liberal, Ks; Morton County Hosp, Elkhart, Ks; Stevens County Hosp, Hugoton, Ks
Group Practice: Orthopaedic Specialists

Data Provided By:
Timothy Noshi Ghattas
(316) 962-3030
1010 N Kansas St
Wichita, KS
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Derek Lee Morgan, MD
(316) 268-5988
Ortho Res Program 929 N St Francis
Wichita, KS
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ar Coll Of Med, Little Rock Ar 72205
Graduation Year: 2002

Data Provided By:
Molly Dianne Black, MD
(316) 268-5988
Ortho Res Program 929 N St Francis
Wichita, KS
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ks Sch Of Med, Kansas City Ks 66103
Graduation Year: 2001

Data Provided By:
Kris Lewonowski, MD
(316) 838-2020
1507 W 21st St N Ste 1
Wichita, KS
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ar Coll Of Med, Little Rock Ar 72205
Graduation Year: 1984
Hospital
Hospital: Wesley Med Ctr, Wichita, Ks; Via Christi Reg Med Ctr -St F, Wichita, Ks
Group Practice: Kansas Orthopaedic Ctr

Data Provided By:
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Cervical Laminectomy

A Patient's Guide to Cervical Laminectomy

Introduction

A laminectomy is a surgical procedure to relieve pressure on the spinal cord due to spinal stenosis. In spinal stenosis, bone spurs press against the spinal cord, leading to a condition called myelopathy. Myelopathy can produce problems with the bowels and bladder, disruptions in the way you walk, and impairments with fine motor skills in the hands. In a laminectomy, a small section of bone covering the back of the spinal cord is removed. Lamina refers to the roof of bone over the back of the spinal cord, and ectomy means the medical procedure for removing a section of the bony roof to take pressure off the spinal cord.

This guide will help you understand

  • why the procedure becomes necessary
  • what surgeons hope to achieve
  • what to expect during your recovery

Anatomy

What parts of the neck are involved?

Surgeons perform this procedure through the back of the neck. This is known as the posterior neck region. It includes the parts that make up the bony ring around the spinal cord (the pedicles and laminae.)

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Cervical Spine Anatomy

Rationale

What do surgeons hope to achieve?

View animation of disc collapse

A laminectomy can alleviate the symptoms of spinal stenosis, a condition that causes the spinal cord to become compressed inside the spinal canal. Wear and tear on the spine from aging and from repeated stresses and strains can cause a spinal disc to begin to collapse. This is the first stage of spinal stenosis. As the space between the vertebrae narrows, the posterior longitudinal ligament that attaches behind the vertebral body may buckle and push against the spinal cord. The degenerative process can also cause bone spurs to develop. When these spurs point into the spinal canal, they squeeze the spinal cord. In a laminectomy, the surgeon removes a section of the lamina bone, the buckled parts of the posterior longitudinal ligament, and the bone spurs, taking pressure off the spinal cord.

Preparation

How will I prepare for surgery?

The decision to proceed with surgery must be made jointly by you and your surgeon. You should understand as much about the procedure as possible. If you have concerns or questions, you should talk to your surgeon.

Once you decide on surgery, your surgeon may suggest a complete physical examination by your regular doctor. This exam helps ensure that you are in the best possible condition to undergo the operation.

On the day of your surgery, you will probably be admitted to the hospital early in the morning. You shouldn't eat or drink anything after midnight the night before.

Surgical Procedure

What happens during the operation?

Patients are given a general anesthesia to put them to sleep during most spine surgeries. As you sleep, your breathing may be assisted with a ventilator. A ventilator is a device that controls and monitors the flo...

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