Cervical Spinal Stenosis Injury Specialists Dublin GA

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James D Peters, DO
(478) 272-3022
Belevue Rd 15 Erin Office Park
Dublin, GA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Hlth Sci, Coll Of Osteo Med, Kansas City Mo 64124
Graduation Year: 1984

Data Provided By:
Charles E Meyers, DDS
(478) 275-9715
906 Hillcrest Pkwy
Dublin, GA
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Paul David Lesko, MD
(478) 274-1200
PO Box 16549
Dublin, GA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Wi Med Sch, Madison Wi 53706
Graduation Year: 1979
Hospital
Hospital: Dr John M Meadows Mem Hosp, Vidalia, Ga; Fairview Park Hosp, Dublin, Ga
Group Practice: Dublin Orthopaedics

Data Provided By:
James W Price
(478) 272-3022
2406 Bellevue Rd
Dublin, GA
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Robert J. Morgan, M.D.
(770) 787-4042
3211 Iris drive
Covington, GA
Business
Resurgens Orthopaedics
Specialties
Orthopedics, Sports Medicine, Shoulder & Elbow Surgery, Knee Ligament Reconstruction & Cartilage Repair, General Orthopaedics
Insurance
Insurance Plans Accepted: Accept most insurance plans

Doctor Information
Primary Hospital: Rockdale Medical Center
Residency Training: Carolinas Medical Center; Charlotte, North Carolina
Medical School: Medical University of South Carolina; Charleston, South Carolina,
Additional Information
Member Organizations: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy Association of North America
Languages Spoken: English

Data Provided By:
James Wilson Price, MD
(478) 272-3022
PO Box 368
Dublin, GA
Specialties
Orthopedics, General Surgery
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Coll Of Ga Sch Of Med, Augusta Ga 30912
Graduation Year: 1979
Hospital
Hospital: Fairview Park Hosp, Dublin, Ga
Group Practice: Dublin Orthopaedics & Rehab

Data Provided By:
James D Peters
(478) 272-3022
2406 Bellevue Rd
Dublin, GA
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Kenneth Hill
(478) 272-1210
1826 Veterans Blvd
Dublin, GA
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
F. daniel Koch, M.D.
(770) 491-3003
2680 Lawrenceville Highway
Decatur, GA
Business
Resurgens Orthopedics
Specialties
Orthopedics, General Orthopaedics, Adult Spine Surgery
Insurance
Insurance Plans Accepted: Accept most insurance plans

Doctor Information
Primary Hospital: Dekalb Medical Center
Residency Training: University of Louisville
Medical School: Duke University,
Additional Information
Member Organizations: Fellow, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
Languages Spoken: English

Data Provided By:
Robert T. Greenfield, III, M.D.
(770) 787-4042
3211 Iris Drive
Covington, GA
Business
Resrugens Orhtopaedics
Specialties
Orthopedics, Adult Spine Surgery, Kyphoplasty, Reconstructive Surgery
Insurance
Insurance Plans Accepted: Accept most plans

Doctor Information
Primary Hospital: Rockdle Medical Center
Residency Training: Howard University College of Medicien
Medical School: Howard University College of Medicine; Washington, D.C.,
Additional Information
Member Organizations: National Medical Association Georgia State Medical Association Atlanta Orthopaedic Society North American Spine Society


Data Provided By:
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Cervical Spinal Stenosis

A Patient's Guide to Cervical Spinal Stenosis

Introduction

Anatomy

What parts make up the spine and neck ?

The spine is made of a column of bones. Each bone, or vertebra, is formed by a round block of bone, called a vertebral body. A bony ring attaches to the back of the vertebral body, forming a canal.

This bony ring is formed by two sets of bones. One set, the pedicle bones, attaches to the back of each vertebral body. On the other end, each pedicle bone connects with a lamina bone. The lamina bones form a protective roof over the back of the spinal cord. When the vertebra bones are stacked on top of each other, the bony rings forms a long bony tube that surrounds and protects the spinal cord as it passes through the spine.

An intervertebral disc fits between each vertebral body and provides a space between the spine bones. The disc works like a shock absorber. It protects the spine against the daily pull of gravity. It also protects the spine during activities that put strong force on the spine, such as jumping, running, and lifting.

An intervertebral disc is made up of two parts. The center, called the nucleus, is spongy. It provides most of the ability to absorb shock. The nucleus is held in place by the annulus, a series of strong ligament rings surrounding it. Ligaments are strong connective tissues that attach bones to other bones.

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Cervical Spine Anatomy

Causes

Why do I have this problem?

The bony spinal canal normally has more than enough room for the spinal cord. Typically, the canal is 17 to 18 millimeters around, slightly less than the size of a penny. Spinal stenosis occurs when the canal narrows to 13 millimeters or less. When the size drops to 10 millimeters, severe symptoms of myelopathy occur. Myelopathy is a term for any condition that affects the spinal cord. The symptoms of myelopathy result from pressure against the spinal cord and reduced blood supply in the spinal cord as a result of the pressure.

Spinal stenosis may develop for any number of reasons. Some of the more common causes of spinal stenosis include

  • congenital stenosis
  • degeneration
  • spinal instability
  • disc herniation
  • constriction of the blood supply to the spinal cord

Congenital Stenosis

Some people are born with a spinal canal that is narrower than normal. This is called congenital stenosis. They may not feel problems early in life, but having a narrow canal to begin with places them at risk for stenosis. Even a minor neck injury can set them up to have pressure against the spinal cord. People born with a narrow spinal canal often have problems later in life, because the canal tends to become narrower due to the affects of aging. These degenerative changes often involve the formation of bone spurs (small bony projections) that point into the spinal canal and put pressure on the spinal cord.

Degeneration

Degeneration is the most c...

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