Cervical Spinal Stenosis Injury Specialists Mitchell SD

This page provides useful content and local businesses that can help with your search for Cervical Spinal Stenosis Injury Specialists. You will find helpful, informative articles about Cervical Spinal Stenosis Injury Specialists, including "Cervical Spinal Stenosis". You will also find local businesses that provide the products or services that you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Mitchell, SD that will answer all of your questions about Cervical Spinal Stenosis Injury Specialists.

Robert Ernest Mc Whirter, MD
(605) 996-7077
1222 E 7th Ave
Mitchell, SD
Specialties
Orthopedics, Emergency Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Coll Of Wi, Milwaukee Wi 53226
Graduation Year: 1972
Hospital
Hospital: Platte Comm Memorial Hospital, Platte, Sd; Queen Of Peace Hospital, Mitchell, Sd
Group Practice: Mitchell Orthopaedic Ctr

Data Provided By:
Marcia Nelsen, MD
(605) 996-5903
2200 N Kimball St Ste 1050
Mitchell, SD
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Sd Sch Of Med, Vermillion Sd, 57069
Graduation Year: 1982
Hospital
Hospital: Sacred Heart Health Services, Yankton, Sd; Sioux Valley Hospital, Sioux Falls, Sd
Group Practice: Praireland Orthopaedics

Data Provided By:
Jesse M Dana, DDS
(605) 717-2722
1306 N Main St
Spearfish, SD
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Gonzalo Henry Sanchez, MD
(605) 222-0075
772 E Dakota Ave
Pierre, SD
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ks Sch Of Med, Kansas City Ks 66103
Graduation Year: 1998

Data Provided By:
Gerald Michael Rieber, MD
1201 Mickelson Dr Ste 1
Watertown, SD
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Mn Med Sch-Minneapolis, Minneapolis Mn 55455
Graduation Year: 1997

Data Provided By:
Felix Flores Ungacta, MD
625 N Foster St
Mitchell, SD
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Georgetown Univ Sch Of Med, Washington Dc 20007
Graduation Year: 1994
Hospital
Hospital: Sioux Valley Hospital, Sioux Falls, Sd

Data Provided By:
Eric S Watson
(605) 331-5890
810 E 23rd St
Sioux Falls, SD
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
H Ray Duncan, DDS
(605) 225-5761
2319 6th Ave SE
Aberdeen, SD
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Donald A DeGrange
(605) 341-1414
7220 S Highway 16
Rapid City, SD
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
John G Kharouf, DDS
(605) 343-4975
720 Saint Anne St
Rapid City, SD
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Cervical Spinal Stenosis

A Patient's Guide to Cervical Spinal Stenosis

Introduction

Anatomy

What parts make up the spine and neck ?

The spine is made of a column of bones. Each bone, or vertebra, is formed by a round block of bone, called a vertebral body. A bony ring attaches to the back of the vertebral body, forming a canal.

This bony ring is formed by two sets of bones. One set, the pedicle bones, attaches to the back of each vertebral body. On the other end, each pedicle bone connects with a lamina bone. The lamina bones form a protective roof over the back of the spinal cord. When the vertebra bones are stacked on top of each other, the bony rings forms a long bony tube that surrounds and protects the spinal cord as it passes through the spine.

An intervertebral disc fits between each vertebral body and provides a space between the spine bones. The disc works like a shock absorber. It protects the spine against the daily pull of gravity. It also protects the spine during activities that put strong force on the spine, such as jumping, running, and lifting.

An intervertebral disc is made up of two parts. The center, called the nucleus, is spongy. It provides most of the ability to absorb shock. The nucleus is held in place by the annulus, a series of strong ligament rings surrounding it. Ligaments are strong connective tissues that attach bones to other bones.

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Cervical Spine Anatomy

Causes

Why do I have this problem?

The bony spinal canal normally has more than enough room for the spinal cord. Typically, the canal is 17 to 18 millimeters around, slightly less than the size of a penny. Spinal stenosis occurs when the canal narrows to 13 millimeters or less. When the size drops to 10 millimeters, severe symptoms of myelopathy occur. Myelopathy is a term for any condition that affects the spinal cord. The symptoms of myelopathy result from pressure against the spinal cord and reduced blood supply in the spinal cord as a result of the pressure.

Spinal stenosis may develop for any number of reasons. Some of the more common causes of spinal stenosis include

  • congenital stenosis
  • degeneration
  • spinal instability
  • disc herniation
  • constriction of the blood supply to the spinal cord

Congenital Stenosis

Some people are born with a spinal canal that is narrower than normal. This is called congenital stenosis. They may not feel problems early in life, but having a narrow canal to begin with places them at risk for stenosis. Even a minor neck injury can set them up to have pressure against the spinal cord. People born with a narrow spinal canal often have problems later in life, because the canal tends to become narrower due to the affects of aging. These degenerative changes often involve the formation of bone spurs (small bony projections) that point into the spinal canal and put pressure on the spinal cord.

Degeneration

Degeneration is the most c...

Click here to read the rest of this article from eOrthopod.com