Cervical Spinal Stenosis Injury Specialists Prineville OR

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Scot E Burgess, DMD
(541) 923-7432
PO Box 697 710 SW Highland Ave
Redmond, OR
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Richard Henry Bolt, MD
(541) 923-4382
3310 NW Tetherow Bridge Loop
Redmond, OR
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Il Coll Of Med, Chicago Il 60680
Graduation Year: 1970
Hospital
Hospital: Memorial Hospital At Oconomowo, Oconomowoc, Wi; Waukesha Memorial Hospital, Waukesha, Wi
Group Practice: Orthopaedic Assoc-Waukesha

Data Provided By:
James Roy Karmy, MD
(541) 923-0728
333 NW Larch Ave
Redmond, OR
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Loma Linda Univ Sch Of Med, Loma Linda Ca 92350
Graduation Year: 1973
Hospital
Hospital: Mountain View Hospital Dist, Madras, Or; Central Oregon District Hosp, Redmond, Or
Group Practice: Redmond Orthopedic Clinic

Data Provided By:
John M Ballard
(503) 540-6300
1600 State Street
Salem, OR
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Dr.David Appleby
(541) 955-0585
1619 NW Hawthorne Ave # 210
Grants Pass, OR
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Rush Med Coll Of Rush Univ
Year of Graduation: 1980
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Hospital: Three Rivers Community Hospita, Grants Pass, Or
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Dr.Brett Gingold
(541) 388-2333
1315 Northwest 4th Street
Redmond, OR
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Vt Coll Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1997
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 3, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Kathleen R Moore, MD
(541) 388-2333
2300 SW Glacier Pl
Redmond, OR
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Or Hlth Sci Univ Sch Of Med, Portland Or 97201
Graduation Year: 1989

Data Provided By:
James Robert Loch, MD
(503) 203-2096
Lake Oswego, OR
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Wayne State Univ Sch Of Med, Detroit Mi 48201
Graduation Year: 1976

Data Provided By:
Douglas S Ainslie, DMD
(503) 227-6537
511 SW 10th Ave Ste 1307
Portland, OR
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Dennis C Deming, DDS
(503) 644-6444
14025 SW Farmington Rd Ste 300
Beaverton, OR
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Cervical Spinal Stenosis

A Patient's Guide to Cervical Spinal Stenosis

Introduction

Anatomy

What parts make up the spine and neck ?

The spine is made of a column of bones. Each bone, or vertebra, is formed by a round block of bone, called a vertebral body. A bony ring attaches to the back of the vertebral body, forming a canal.

This bony ring is formed by two sets of bones. One set, the pedicle bones, attaches to the back of each vertebral body. On the other end, each pedicle bone connects with a lamina bone. The lamina bones form a protective roof over the back of the spinal cord. When the vertebra bones are stacked on top of each other, the bony rings forms a long bony tube that surrounds and protects the spinal cord as it passes through the spine.

An intervertebral disc fits between each vertebral body and provides a space between the spine bones. The disc works like a shock absorber. It protects the spine against the daily pull of gravity. It also protects the spine during activities that put strong force on the spine, such as jumping, running, and lifting.

An intervertebral disc is made up of two parts. The center, called the nucleus, is spongy. It provides most of the ability to absorb shock. The nucleus is held in place by the annulus, a series of strong ligament rings surrounding it. Ligaments are strong connective tissues that attach bones to other bones.

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Cervical Spine Anatomy

Causes

Why do I have this problem?

The bony spinal canal normally has more than enough room for the spinal cord. Typically, the canal is 17 to 18 millimeters around, slightly less than the size of a penny. Spinal stenosis occurs when the canal narrows to 13 millimeters or less. When the size drops to 10 millimeters, severe symptoms of myelopathy occur. Myelopathy is a term for any condition that affects the spinal cord. The symptoms of myelopathy result from pressure against the spinal cord and reduced blood supply in the spinal cord as a result of the pressure.

Spinal stenosis may develop for any number of reasons. Some of the more common causes of spinal stenosis include

  • congenital stenosis
  • degeneration
  • spinal instability
  • disc herniation
  • constriction of the blood supply to the spinal cord

Congenital Stenosis

Some people are born with a spinal canal that is narrower than normal. This is called congenital stenosis. They may not feel problems early in life, but having a narrow canal to begin with places them at risk for stenosis. Even a minor neck injury can set them up to have pressure against the spinal cord. People born with a narrow spinal canal often have problems later in life, because the canal tends to become narrower due to the affects of aging. These degenerative changes often involve the formation of bone spurs (small bony projections) that point into the spinal canal and put pressure on the spinal cord.

Degeneration

Degeneration is the most c...

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