Complex Shoulder Fractures Oskaloosa IA

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Sreedhar Somisetty
(641) 672-3360
410 N 12th St
Oskaloosa, IA
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Sreedhar Somisetty, MD
410 N 12th St
Oskaloosa, IA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Osmania Med Coll, Univ Hlth Sci, Vijayawada, Hyderabad, Ap, India
Graduation Year: 1990

Data Provided By:
Dr. Kenneth Van Wyk
Van Wyk Chiropractic Center
(641) 628-3511
911 Washington St
Pella, IA
Specialty
Chiropractor
Conditions
Back pain,Chronic pain,Geriatric care,Leg pain,Lower back pain,Migraine headaches,Neck pain,Neuropathy conditions,Sports injuries,Upper back pain,Whiplash
Treatments
Acupuncture,Chiropractic adjustment,Chiropractic care,DiathermyMyofascialDecompression,Natural healing,Spinal manipulation,Ultrasound
Proffesional Affiliation
Iowa Chiropractic Society (ICS),American Chiropractic Association (ACA)

Christopher E Scott
(319) 338-3606
2751 Northgate Dr
Iowa City, IA
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Reginald R Cooper
(319) 356-3470
200 Hawkins Dr
Iowa City, IA
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Michael Jos Parks, MD
(517) 437-5399
610 N 12th St Ste B
Oskaloosa, IA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Il Coll Of Med, Chicago Il 60680
Graduation Year: 1976

Data Provided By:
Daniel Wayne Vande Lune, MD
(641) 621-1390
404 Jefferson St Ste L122B
Pella, IA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ia Coll Of Med, Iowa City Ia 52242
Graduation Year: 1991
Hospital
Hospital: Mahaska County Hosp, Oskaloosa, Ia
Group Practice: Iowa Orthopedics Ctr

Data Provided By:
Dr. Russell VanHemert
Van Hemert Health Partners P.C.
(641) 628-2099
1310 Washington Street
Pella, IA
Specialty
Chiropractor
Conditions
Back pain,Chronic pain,Leg pain,Lower back pain,Neck pain,Upper back pain
Treatments
Chiropractic adjustment,Chiropractic care,Spinal manipulation

Edward Gletty Law, MD
(319) 338-3606
2751 Northgate Dr
Iowa City, IA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ia Coll Of Med, Iowa City Ia 52242
Graduation Year: 1979

Data Provided By:
James J Wheeler, DDS
(319) 356-4663
University of Iowa Dept of Hospital Dentistry
Iowa City, IA
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
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Best Way to Surgically Treat Complex Shoulder Fractures

When it comes to complex fractures of the humerus (upper arm) in older adults, surgeons really have their work cut out for them. There are so many things to keep in mind. A complex fracture usually means the bone is broken into three or four parts. Putting the pieces back together in a way that promotes recovery and return to full function can be a real challenge.

The age of the person matters because people over age 70 often have low bone mass and slow healing. The way in which the bone has fractured, the anatomy of the underlying structures, and risk of ischemia (loss of blood supply to the bone) are additional variables to consider. The chances of developing osteonecrosis (death of the bone) increase with each one of these factors.

A very well-known surgeon (Dr. Charles Neer) introduced the idea of replacing the shoulder instead of trying to repair it. That was back in 1970. Since then, surgeons have tried full joint replacement and hemiarthroplasty (replacing only one side of the joint). These methods have proven to work but not always smoothly. Ischemia and osteonecrosis are still major concerns. Pain relief and improvement in function and recovery aren't always guaranteed.

So, experts have gone back to the drawing board to rethink surgical treatment for these complex proximal humeral fractures. Proximal means the break occurred at the top of the shoulder where the round head and of the femur are located. They asked themselves if the results could be improved with better surgical technique.

They have tried developing implants specifically designed for the type of fracture involved. They have studied the anatomy of the joint very carefully trying to mimic it in every way with reconstructive surgery. Achieving optimal anatomical structures involves the structure, shape, angle, length, and orientation of bone, muscle, tendons, ligaments, even fat deposits.

To give you one example of why this is all important -- getting the proper height of the implant in the joint requires restoring the exact shape (contour) of the humerus where some of the muscles attach. Using the other shoulder as a template helps the surgeon reproduce "normal" as much as possible on the operative (fractured) side.

That brings us to the latest efforts in this area. This article reports on the use of reverse shoulder arthroplasty for three- and four-part proximal humeral fractures. The broken pieces are removed and replaced with a prosthesis (artificial joint). In the "normal" shoulder replacement, the socket side of the implant is a shallow plastic piece and the humeral component is a metal stem attached to a metal ball. In the reverse shoulder replacement, the ball and the socket are reversed.

Naturally, when a new technique is tried, the results must be recorded and reported. Studies done so far have been limited with small numbers of patients and short-term results. But so far the results have been more predictable with improved ...

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