Elbow Injury Treatment Bristol RI

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Edward Akelman, MD
(401) 457-1500
2 Dudley St
Providence, RI
Business
University Orthopedics Inc
Specialties
Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Thomas Patrick Galvin, MD
(617) 675-7090
1010 S Main St
Fall River, MA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Loyola Univ Of Chicago Stritch Sch Of Med, Maywood Il 60153
Graduation Year: 1969

Data Provided By:
Gary M Ferguson, MD
(401) 846-2547
46 Nayatt Rd
Barrington, RI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Tufts Univ Sch Of Med, Boston Ma 02111
Graduation Year: 1981

Data Provided By:
Louis A Fuchs
(508) 675-6104
324 Seaview Ave
Swansea, MA
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Jerald Wayne Katz, MD
(508) 646-9525
235 Hanover St
Fall River, MA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: New York Med Coll, Valhalla Ny 10595
Graduation Year: 1984

Data Provided By:
Thomas P Galvin
(508) 675-4100
1010 S Main St
Fall River, MA
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Glenn Alan Dubler, MD
289 Pleasant St
Fall River, MA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Emory Univ Sch Of Med, Atlanta Ga 30322
Graduation Year: 1982

Data Provided By:
Kenneth G Knowles, MD FACS
(401) 739-1477
1268 Warwick Neck Ave
Warwick, RI
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Tufts
Graduation Year: 1957

Data Provided By:
David Bullis
(508) 646-9525
235 Hanover St
Fall River, MA
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Dr.Kevin Mabie
(508) 646-9525
235 Hanover St # M2
Fall River, MA
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ma Med Sch
Year of Graduation: 1979
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
3.5, out of 5 based on 2, reviews.

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Treating Unstable Elbow Injuries

The elbow is normally a very stable, solid joint. It doesn't dislocate easily. But when a traumatic injury occurs and enough force is placed on it, fracture and dislocation can be the result. In this continuing medical education (CME) article, orthopedic surgeons from the Hand and Upper Extremity Service at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston present an update on the surgical repair of traumatic elbow instability.

The key anatomical feature of elbow dislocations is the lateral collateral ligament (LCL). When this important stabilizing structure is torn or damaged as a result of injury, elbow instability is often the result. Instability means the joint keeps slipping out of place. There can be a partial dislocation called subluxation or a full, recurrent (repeated) dislocation.

Other important anatomical features of the elbow needed for joint stability include the capsule and surrounding ligaments, tendons, and muscles. The joint capsule is a fibrous covering much like the gristle at the end of a chicken bone. Injuries from a sudden fall that result in a simple dislocation can damage any of these soft tissue structure. "Simple" means there is no bone fracture.

More complex elbow dislocations involve fractures of any of the bones that make up the joint. This can include either of the bones in the forearm (radius, ulna) or the bottom of the humerus (upper arm bone) where it joins the forearm bones to form the elbow. The exact type of elbow dislocation and which soft tissues or bones are affected depends on the force(s) placed on the elbow at the time of the injury.

Simple elbow dislocations can often be reduced (put back in place) without surgery. More complex dislocations require a surgical procedure to reduce the joint and repair the damage. Nonsurgical relocation is followed by wearing a splint for a few weeks (two to three weeks) while the soft tissues are healing. Patients are advised to avoid moving the arm away from the body as this puts too much force on the healing elbow.

Dislocations that involve fracture of the radius where it connects to the elbow and the coronoid process are called the terrible triad. The coronoid process is the bottom lip of the ulna at the elbow. The "triad" (meaning three) refers to the dislocation itself plus fractures of the two forearm bones.

Modern treatment of this injury involves repairing (or replacing) the broken radial head, wiring the broken pieces of the coronoid together, and reattaching the torn lateral collateral ligament (LCL). Sometimes a long plate is attached (with screws) to the broken bones to hold them together until bone union takes place. The authors provide specific details about the type and location of the surgical incision and sutures for this procedure.

The decision about just what type of surgery to do depends on the extent of the damage. The surgeon may not know in advance what will be done exactly. Once the arm is opened up and the area ...

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