Elbow Injury Treatment Dodge City KS

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Alexander Baxter Neel, MD
(620) 225-7744
2300 N 14th Ave Ste 104
Dodge City, KS
Specialties
Orthopedics, General Surgery
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Rochester Sch Of Med & Dentistry, Rochester Ny 14642
Graduation Year: 1982
Hospital
Hospital: Pratt Reg Med Ctr, Pratt, Ks; Western Plains Reg Hosp, Dodge City, Ks
Group Practice: Orthopedics & Sports Medicine

Data Provided By:
Alok Shah
(620) 227-1371
2020 Central Ave
Dodge City, KS
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Robert D Kennemer, DDS
(785) 625-9714
1012 E 29th St
Hays, KS
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Michael Jay Schmidt, MD
(785) 233-7491
6001 SW 6th Ave Ste 200
Topeka, KS
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ks Sch Of Med, Kansas City Ks 66103
Graduation Year: 1979

Data Provided By:
Stephen Keith Bubb, MD
(913) 319-7697
3651 College Blvd
Leawood, KS
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ks Sch Of Med, Kansas City Ks 66103
Graduation Year: 1974
Hospital
Hospital: Shawnee Mission Med Ctr, Shawnee Msn, Ks
Group Practice: Orthopedic & Sports Medicine

Data Provided By:
Richard J Ackerman, DDS
(620) 227-2234
705 1st Ave Ste B
Dodge City, KS
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Kenneth Jansson
(316) 631-1600
2778 N Webb Rd
Wichita, KS
Business
Advanced Orthopaedics Associates
Specialties
Orthopedics, Sports Medicine, Arthroscopic Surgery
Insurance
Insurance Plans Accepted: Almost all insurance plans accepted.
Medicare Accepted: Yes
Workmens Comp Accepted: Yes
Accepts Uninsured Patients: Yes

Doctor Information
Primary Hospital: Kansas Surgery and Recovery Center; Surgicare of Wichita
Residency Training: Wilford Hall USAF Medical Center, Lackland AFB, TX
Medical School: Darthmouth, 1982
Additional Information
Member Organizations: American College of Sports Medicine American Medical Association American Medical Society for Sports Medicine American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine Arthroscopy Association of North America Fellow American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeo


Data Provided By:
Jon Christian Thompson, MD
(785) 239-7678
600 Casson Hill Rd
Fort Riley, KS
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Uniformed Services Univ Of The Hlth Sci, Bethesda Md 20814
Graduation Year: 1999

Data Provided By:
Todd Allen Swenning, MD
(210) 567-5135
Ortho Res Program 929 N St Francis
Wichita, KS
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Sd Sch Of Med, Vermillion Sd, 57069
Graduation Year: 1997

Data Provided By:
Duane Albert Murphy, MD
(316) 219-8299
2778 N Webb Rd
Wichita, KS
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ks Sch Of Med, Kansas City Ks 66103
Graduation Year: 1965
Hospital
Hospital: Wesley Med Ctr, Wichita, Ks; Kansas Surgery & Recovery Ctr, Wichita, Ks
Group Practice: Advanced Orthopaedic Assoc

Data Provided By:
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Treating Unstable Elbow Injuries

The elbow is normally a very stable, solid joint. It doesn't dislocate easily. But when a traumatic injury occurs and enough force is placed on it, fracture and dislocation can be the result. In this continuing medical education (CME) article, orthopedic surgeons from the Hand and Upper Extremity Service at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston present an update on the surgical repair of traumatic elbow instability.

The key anatomical feature of elbow dislocations is the lateral collateral ligament (LCL). When this important stabilizing structure is torn or damaged as a result of injury, elbow instability is often the result. Instability means the joint keeps slipping out of place. There can be a partial dislocation called subluxation or a full, recurrent (repeated) dislocation.

Other important anatomical features of the elbow needed for joint stability include the capsule and surrounding ligaments, tendons, and muscles. The joint capsule is a fibrous covering much like the gristle at the end of a chicken bone. Injuries from a sudden fall that result in a simple dislocation can damage any of these soft tissue structure. "Simple" means there is no bone fracture.

More complex elbow dislocations involve fractures of any of the bones that make up the joint. This can include either of the bones in the forearm (radius, ulna) or the bottom of the humerus (upper arm bone) where it joins the forearm bones to form the elbow. The exact type of elbow dislocation and which soft tissues or bones are affected depends on the force(s) placed on the elbow at the time of the injury.

Simple elbow dislocations can often be reduced (put back in place) without surgery. More complex dislocations require a surgical procedure to reduce the joint and repair the damage. Nonsurgical relocation is followed by wearing a splint for a few weeks (two to three weeks) while the soft tissues are healing. Patients are advised to avoid moving the arm away from the body as this puts too much force on the healing elbow.

Dislocations that involve fracture of the radius where it connects to the elbow and the coronoid process are called the terrible triad. The coronoid process is the bottom lip of the ulna at the elbow. The "triad" (meaning three) refers to the dislocation itself plus fractures of the two forearm bones.

Modern treatment of this injury involves repairing (or replacing) the broken radial head, wiring the broken pieces of the coronoid together, and reattaching the torn lateral collateral ligament (LCL). Sometimes a long plate is attached (with screws) to the broken bones to hold them together until bone union takes place. The authors provide specific details about the type and location of the surgical incision and sutures for this procedure.

The decision about just what type of surgery to do depends on the extent of the damage. The surgeon may not know in advance what will be done exactly. Once the arm is opened up and the area ...

Click here to read the rest of this article from eOrthopod.com