Elbow Injury Treatment Prescott Valley AZ

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Spencer F Schuenman
(928) 772-5320
3237 N Windsong Dr
Prescott Valley, AZ
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Dr.Mark Davis
3237 North Windsong Drive
Prescott Valley, AZ
Gender
M
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Hospital: Tri City Surgery Center
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
2.5, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Robert B Nichols, MD
(928) 772-7414
Prescott, AZ
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided By:
Michael Gregory Orr, MD
(928) 777-0700
2078 Willow Creek Rd
Prescott, AZ
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Sd Sch Of Med, Vermillion Sd, 57069
Graduation Year: 1977
Hospital
Hospital: Yavapai Reg Med Ctr, Prescott, Az
Group Practice: Yavapai Regional Medical Center

Data Provided By:
John Aloysius Bennan, MD
(928) 778-0922
1001 Division St
Prescott, AZ
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Northwestern Univ Med Sch, Chicago Il 60611
Graduation Year: 1964

Data Provided By:
Paul Christian Pflueger
(928) 772-5320
3237 N Windsong Dr
Prescott Valley, AZ
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Richard D Collison, MD
(928) 778-9250
PO Box 2860
Prescott, AZ
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided By:
Richard D Collison
(928) 778-2405
1003 Willow Creek Rd
Prescott, AZ
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Richard James Lane, MD
(928) 778-0922
1001 Division St
Prescott, AZ
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Miami Sch Of Med, Miami Fl 33101
Graduation Year: 1976

Data Provided By:
Francisco Jaume, DO
(740) 622-1200
1050 Gail Gardner Way
Prescott, AZ
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Umdnj-Sch Of Osteo Med, Stratford Nj 08084
Graduation Year: 1992

Data Provided By:
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Treating Unstable Elbow Injuries

The elbow is normally a very stable, solid joint. It doesn't dislocate easily. But when a traumatic injury occurs and enough force is placed on it, fracture and dislocation can be the result. In this continuing medical education (CME) article, orthopedic surgeons from the Hand and Upper Extremity Service at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston present an update on the surgical repair of traumatic elbow instability.

The key anatomical feature of elbow dislocations is the lateral collateral ligament (LCL). When this important stabilizing structure is torn or damaged as a result of injury, elbow instability is often the result. Instability means the joint keeps slipping out of place. There can be a partial dislocation called subluxation or a full, recurrent (repeated) dislocation.

Other important anatomical features of the elbow needed for joint stability include the capsule and surrounding ligaments, tendons, and muscles. The joint capsule is a fibrous covering much like the gristle at the end of a chicken bone. Injuries from a sudden fall that result in a simple dislocation can damage any of these soft tissue structure. "Simple" means there is no bone fracture.

More complex elbow dislocations involve fractures of any of the bones that make up the joint. This can include either of the bones in the forearm (radius, ulna) or the bottom of the humerus (upper arm bone) where it joins the forearm bones to form the elbow. The exact type of elbow dislocation and which soft tissues or bones are affected depends on the force(s) placed on the elbow at the time of the injury.

Simple elbow dislocations can often be reduced (put back in place) without surgery. More complex dislocations require a surgical procedure to reduce the joint and repair the damage. Nonsurgical relocation is followed by wearing a splint for a few weeks (two to three weeks) while the soft tissues are healing. Patients are advised to avoid moving the arm away from the body as this puts too much force on the healing elbow.

Dislocations that involve fracture of the radius where it connects to the elbow and the coronoid process are called the terrible triad. The coronoid process is the bottom lip of the ulna at the elbow. The "triad" (meaning three) refers to the dislocation itself plus fractures of the two forearm bones.

Modern treatment of this injury involves repairing (or replacing) the broken radial head, wiring the broken pieces of the coronoid together, and reattaching the torn lateral collateral ligament (LCL). Sometimes a long plate is attached (with screws) to the broken bones to hold them together until bone union takes place. The authors provide specific details about the type and location of the surgical incision and sutures for this procedure.

The decision about just what type of surgery to do depends on the extent of the damage. The surgeon may not know in advance what will be done exactly. Once the arm is opened up and the area ...

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