Hamstring Injury Specialists Fairmont WV

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Peter Kent Thrush, MD
(304) 366-2151
1708 Locust Ave Ste 101
Fairmont, WV
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Wv Univ Sch Of Med, Morgantown Wv 26506
Graduation Year: 1973

Data Provided By:
Peter Kent Thrush
(304) 366-2151
1708 Locust Ave
Fairmont, WV
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Jack Scott Koay
(304) 366-6511
19 Oakwood Rd
Fairmont, WV
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Jack S Koay, MD
(304) 366-6511
19 Oakwood Rd
Fairmont, WV
Specialties
Orthopedics, Hand Surgery
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Coll Of Med Natl Taiwan Univ, Taipei, Taiwan (244-02 Eff 1/1971)
Graduation Year: 1964
Hospital
Hospital: Fairmont Gen Hosp, Fairmont, Wv
Group Practice: Jack S Koay Inc

Data Provided By:
Chris A Martin, DDS
(513) 563-7979
Medical Center Dr
Morgantown, WV
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
James E Valentine, DDS
(304) 363-2008
907 Gaston Ave
Fairmont, WV
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Cynthia L Bonafield, DDS
(304) 363-2008
907 Gaston Ave
Fairmont, WV
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Hany Maher Tadros
(304) 333-3400
48 Vip Way
Fairmont, WV
Specialty
General Surgery, Hand Surgery

Data Provided By:
David Frederick Hubbard, MD
(304) 293-3900
1 Stadium Drive
Morgantown, WV
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Marshall Univ Sch Of Med, Huntington Wv 25755
Graduation Year: 1989
Hospital
Hospital: Monongalia County General Hosp, Morgantown, Wv; W V University Hospital -Ruby, Morgantown, Wv
Group Practice: University Health Associates

Data Provided By:
James E Cain Jr, MD
101 Stadium Dr
Morgantown, WV
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Georgetown Univ Sch Of Med, Washington Dc 20007
Graduation Year: 1982

Data Provided By:
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Hamstring Injuries

A Patient's Guide to Hamstring Injuries

Introduction

The big group of muscles and tendons in the back of the thigh are commonly called the hamstrings. Injuries in this powerful muscle group are common, especially in athletes. Hamstring injuries happen to all types of athletes, from Olympic sprinters to slow-pitch softball players. Though these injuries can be very painful, they will usually heal on their own. But for an injured hamstring to return to full function, it needs special attention and a specially designed rehabilitation program.

This guide will help you understand

  • how the hamstrings work
  • why hamstring injuries cause problems
  • how doctors treat the condition

Anatomy

Where are the hamstrings, and what do they do?

The hamstrings make up the bulk in back of the thigh. They are formed by three muscles and their tendons. The hamstrings connect to the ischial tuberosity, the small bony projection on the bottom of the pelvis, just below the buttocks. (There is one ischial tuberosity on the left and one on the right.) The hamstring muscles run down the back of the thigh. Their tendons cross the knee joint and connect on each side of the shinbone (tibia).

The hamstrings function by pulling the leg backward and by propelling the body forward while walking or running. This is called hip extension. The hamstrings also bend the knees, a motion called knee flexion.

Most hamstring injuries occur in the musculotendinous complex. This is the area where the muscles and tendons join. (Tendons are bands of tissue that connect muscles to bones.) The hamstring has a large musculotendinous complex, which partly explains why hamstring injuries are so common.

When the hamstring is injured, the fibers of the muscles or tendon are actually torn. The body responds to the damage by producing enzymes and other body chemicals at the site of the injury. These chemicals produce the symptoms of swelling and pain.

In a severe injury, the small blood vessels in the muscle can be torn as well. This results in bleeding into the muscle tissue. Until these small blood vessels can repair themselves, less blood can flow to the area. With this reduced blood flow, the muscles cannot begin to heal.

The chemicals that are produced and the blood clotting are your body's way of healing itself. Your body heals the muscle by rebuilding the muscle tissue and by forming scar tissue. Carefully stretching and exercising your injured muscle helps maximize the building of muscle tissue as you heal.

In rare cases, an injury can cause the muscle and tendons to tear away from the bone. This happens most often where the hamstring tendons attach to the ischial tuberosity. These tears, called avulsions, sometimes require surgery.

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Knee Anatomy

Causes

How do hamstring injuries occur?

Hamstring injuries happen when the muscles are stretched too far. Sprinting and other fast or twisting m...

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