Hand Infection Treatment Lake Charles LA

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Richard Jones Chafin, DDS
(337) 436-3631
790 E Bayou Pines Dr
Lake Charles, LA
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Craig Hannie Crawford, DDS
(408) 470-1365
701 W College St
Lake Charles, LA
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Michael Alan Hinton, MD
(337) 494-4900
1717 Oak Park Blvd Fl 3
Lake Charles, LA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: La State Univ Sch Of Med In New Orleans, New Orleans La 70112
Graduation Year: 1989

Data Provided By:
Nathan Phillip Cohen, MD
(337) 494-4900
1717 Oak Park Blvd Fl 3
Lake Charles, LA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Western Ontario, Fac Of Med, London, Ont, Canada
Graduation Year: 1975
Hospital
Hospital: Lake Charles Mem Hosp, Lake Charles, La; Christus St Patrick Hosp, Lake Charles, La
Group Practice: Center For Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Lynn Edward Foret, MD
(337) 562-1000
640 S Ryan St
Lake Charles, LA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: La State Univ Sch Of Med In New Orleans, New Orleans La 70112
Graduation Year: 1975

Data Provided By:
Alan Carl Perry, DDS
(337) 478-2805
2805 Aster St
Lake Charles, LA
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Edward W Phillips, MD
(337) 433-3647
809 Shell Beach Dr
Lake Charles, LA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Tulane Univ Sch Of Med, New Orleans La 70112
Graduation Year: 1953

Data Provided By:
Edward W Phillips Jr, MD
(337) 433-3647
Lake Charles, LA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Tulane Univ Sch Of Med, New Orleans La 70112
Graduation Year: 1953

Data Provided By:
Daniel R Yanicko Jr, MD
(337) 433-8400
501 S Ryan St
Lake Charles, LA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Hahnemann Univ Sch Of Med, Philadelphia Pa 19102
Graduation Year: 1982
Hospital
Hospital: Lake Charles Mem Hosp, Lake Charles, La; Christus St Patrick Hosp, Lake Charles, La
Group Practice: Lake Charles Medical & Surgical Clinic

Data Provided By:
David Jacob Drez Jr, MD
(337) 494-4902
1717 Oak Park Blvd Fl 3RD
Lake Charles, LA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Tulane Univ Sch Of Med, New Orleans La 70112
Graduation Year: 1963

Data Provided By:
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Diagnosis and Treatment of Hand Infections

In this article, hand surgeons from the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Washington, D.C. offer us a review of rare, but potentially disabling hand infections. They focus on two infections of the wrist, hand, or fingers: osteomyelitis and septic arthritis. Causes, type of bacteria involved, patient symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment are summarized for each condition. Complications with and without treatment are also presented.

Osteomyelitis is an infection of the bone or bone marrow that can affect the hand. The most common infecting bacteria are staph, strep, and e coli. Undiagnosed, delayed diagnosis, or untreated, any of these infectious agents can cause destruction of the joint. Loss of motion, impaired function, and eventual arthritis with pain, stiffness, and disability can occur. The disease process can get so bad, a person can lose the affected hand.

How does a person get osteomyelitis of the hand or wrist? There are three main mechanisms: 1) puncture wounds (e.g., human bites, thorns, fractures, and surgery), 2) spread from infection of nearby soft tissues, and 3) spread through the blood system from any other infection in the body.

The immune system sets up an inflammatory response and tries to wall off the infection. In the healthy child or adult, this reaction may be enough to take care of the problem. But malnutrition, smoking, medications that suppress the immune system, and cancer or other health problems can put the patient at a disadvantage for self-healing.

In the case of one particular bacteria (methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus or MRSA, pronounced "mersa"), even healthy people can be affected. Tissue invasion and severe bone destruction can occur quickly. That's why early diagnosis and immediate treatment is recommended for hand infections of this type.

How does the hand surgeon know a patient has an osteomyelitis-linked hand infection? There are usually visual signs (swelling, redness, warmth) and pain. The patient may have a fever with chills and fatigue. These flu-like symptoms are a red flag of systemic (system-wide) infection. Blood tests and imaging studies possibly including X-rays, bone scans, PET scans, MRIs, and other more advanced imaging aid in making the diagnosis.

Once it's clear what the surgeon is dealing with, then treatment begins. Antibiotics may be all that's needed if the problem is identified and caught early. But most of the time, surgery is needed to debride (clean out) the area. This surgical procedure is followed by a course of antibiotics as well.

It may be necessary to perform more than one debridement, a process called serial debridement. Serial debridement is done until the affected area is clear of infection. The whole process can take six weeks or more. If the infection has occurred around an implant (e.g., joint replacement or hardware used to repair a fracture), the implant may have to be removed before debridement and antibiot...

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