Hand Infection Treatment Las Vegas NV

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G. Michael Elkanich, M.D.
(702) 474-7200
2020 Palomino Lane
Las Vegas, NV
Business
Bone & Joint Specialists
Specialties
Orthopedics, Degenerative Spinal Conditions
Cervical, Thoracic, and Lumbar Fusion
Cervical, Thoracic, and Lumbar Diskectomy
Cervical, Thoracic, and Lumbar Decompression
Total Disk Replacement - Cervical & Lumbar
Endoscopic Spinal Fusion
M
Insurance
Medicare Accepted: Yes
Workmens Comp Accepted: Yes
Accepts Uninsured Patients: Yes
Emergency Care: Yes

Doctor Information
Primary Hospital: Valley Medical Center
Residency Training: Stanford University Hosptial & Clinics
Medical School: University Of Arizona College of Medicine, 1997
Additional Information
Member Organizations: North American Spine Society
American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
American Medical Association
State Medical Society
State Orthopaedic Society

Awards: American Board of Orthopaedic Surgeons - Board Certified
Languages Spoken: English,Spanish,Chinese

Data Provided By:
Ascar Egtedar, MD
(702) 878-9444
2601 W Charleston Blvd Ste A
Las Vegas, NV
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided By:
Gerald Mark Sylvain, MD
(702) 388-1008
3100 W Charleston Blvd
Las Vegas, NV
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Nv Sch Of Med, Reno Nv 89557
Graduation Year: 1991

Data Provided By:
Kayvan Taghipour-Khiabani
(702) 671-5110
1707 W Charleston Blvd
Las Vegas, NV
Specialty
Hand Surgery

Data Provided By:
Chester W Eskey, MD FACS
(702) 387-7807
1650 Waldman Ave
Las Vegas, NV
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Jefferson
Graduation Year: 1949

Data Provided By:
Archie C Perry, MD
(701) 731-1616
2800 E Desert Inn Rd
Las Vegas, NV
Business
Desert Orthopaedic Center
Specialties
Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Ascar Eghtedar, MD
(702) 878-9444
2601 W Charleston Blvd
Las Vegas, NV
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Teheran Univ, Fac Of Med, Teheran, Iran
Graduation Year: 1959

Data Provided By:
Mark Jesse Saylor, DDS
(702) 870-1350
1350 S Decatur Blvd
Las Vegas, NV
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Michael Young Han, MD
2450 W Charleston Blvd
Las Vegas, NV
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Stanford Univ Sch Of Med, Stanford Ca 94305
Graduation Year: 1999

Data Provided By:
Himansu R Shah
(702) 671-5110
1707 W Charleston Blvd
Las Vegas, NV
Specialty
Hand Surgery

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Diagnosis and Treatment of Hand Infections

In this article, hand surgeons from the Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Washington, D.C. offer us a review of rare, but potentially disabling hand infections. They focus on two infections of the wrist, hand, or fingers: osteomyelitis and septic arthritis. Causes, type of bacteria involved, patient symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment are summarized for each condition. Complications with and without treatment are also presented.

Osteomyelitis is an infection of the bone or bone marrow that can affect the hand. The most common infecting bacteria are staph, strep, and e coli. Undiagnosed, delayed diagnosis, or untreated, any of these infectious agents can cause destruction of the joint. Loss of motion, impaired function, and eventual arthritis with pain, stiffness, and disability can occur. The disease process can get so bad, a person can lose the affected hand.

How does a person get osteomyelitis of the hand or wrist? There are three main mechanisms: 1) puncture wounds (e.g., human bites, thorns, fractures, and surgery), 2) spread from infection of nearby soft tissues, and 3) spread through the blood system from any other infection in the body.

The immune system sets up an inflammatory response and tries to wall off the infection. In the healthy child or adult, this reaction may be enough to take care of the problem. But malnutrition, smoking, medications that suppress the immune system, and cancer or other health problems can put the patient at a disadvantage for self-healing.

In the case of one particular bacteria (methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus or MRSA, pronounced "mersa"), even healthy people can be affected. Tissue invasion and severe bone destruction can occur quickly. That's why early diagnosis and immediate treatment is recommended for hand infections of this type.

How does the hand surgeon know a patient has an osteomyelitis-linked hand infection? There are usually visual signs (swelling, redness, warmth) and pain. The patient may have a fever with chills and fatigue. These flu-like symptoms are a red flag of systemic (system-wide) infection. Blood tests and imaging studies possibly including X-rays, bone scans, PET scans, MRIs, and other more advanced imaging aid in making the diagnosis.

Once it's clear what the surgeon is dealing with, then treatment begins. Antibiotics may be all that's needed if the problem is identified and caught early. But most of the time, surgery is needed to debride (clean out) the area. This surgical procedure is followed by a course of antibiotics as well.

It may be necessary to perform more than one debridement, a process called serial debridement. Serial debridement is done until the affected area is clear of infection. The whole process can take six weeks or more. If the infection has occurred around an implant (e.g., joint replacement or hardware used to repair a fracture), the implant may have to be removed before debridement and antibiot...

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