Hip Surgeons Oshkosh WI

This page provides useful content and local businesses that can help with your search for Hip Surgeons. You will find helpful, informative articles about Hip Surgeons, including "Hip Pinning Surgery for a Fractured Hip". You will also find local businesses that provide the products or services that you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Oshkosh, WI that will answer all of your questions about Hip Surgeons.

Jeffrey R Mc Laughlin, MD
(920) 223-0123
2700 W 9th Ave Ste 125
Oshkosh, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Md Sch Of Med, Baltimore Md 21201
Graduation Year: 1986

Data Provided By:
Davis Chengyu Tsai, MD
(920) 231-2828
2700 W 9th Ave Ste 125
Oshkosh, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Northwestern Univ Med Sch, Chicago Il 60611
Graduation Year: 1994

Data Provided By:
Ilan I Shapiro
(920) 303-8700
855 N Westhaven Dr
Oshkosh, WI
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
John S Boyle
(920) 303-8700
855 N Westhaven Dr
Oshkosh, WI
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
William S Schuster, DDS
(920) 231-4922
2626 W 9th Ave
Oshkosh, WI
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Michael John Maslowski, DDS
(920) 231-4922
2626 W 9th Ave
Oshkosh, WI
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Dr.Benjamin Begley
(920) 231-2828
3475 Omro Road #300
Oshkosh, WI
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: In Univ Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1987
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Hospital: Mercy Med Ctr, Oshkosh, Wi
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided By:
David Hunter Romond, MD
(920) 233-2773
2700 W 9th Ave Ste 220
Oshkosh, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Yale Univ Sch Of Med, New Haven Ct 06510
Graduation Year: 1972

Data Provided By:
Benjamin William Begley, MD
(920) 231-2828
2130 W 9th Ave
Oshkosh, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: In Univ Sch Of Med, Indianapolis In 46202
Graduation Year: 1987
Hospital
Hospital: Mercy Med Ctr, Oshkosh, Wi
Group Practice: Orthopedic Associates Oshkosh

Data Provided By:
Jeffrey George Bentson, MD
2700 W 9th Ave Ste 220
Oshkosh, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Wayne State Univ Sch Of Med, Detroit Mi 48201
Graduation Year: 1997

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Hip Pinning Surgery for a Fractured Hip

A Patient's Guide to Hip Pinning Surgery for a Fractured Hip

Introduction

A fractured hip can be a life-threatening problem. The hip fracture isn't usually a difficult problem to treat with surgery. But once the fracture occurs, it brings with it all the potential medical complications that can arise when aging adults are confined to bed. The goal of treatment is to get patients moving as quickly as possible after surgery. Surgery to pin the broken ends of the fracture together is fairly simple and allows patients to get up and begin moving shortly after surgery.

This guide will help you understand

  • what the surgeon hopes to achieve
  • what happens during the procedure
  • what to expect as you recover

Anatomy

How is the hip designed?

The femur is the large bone of the thigh. The ball-shaped femoral head on the end of the femur fits into a socket in the pelvis called the acetabulum. The femoral neck is a thinner part of the femur. It is the short section of bone that connects the femoral head to the main shaft of the bone. The bump on the outside of the femur just below the femoral neck is called the greater trochanter. This is where the large muscles of the buttock attach to the femur.

Hip fractures in aging adults happen either in the femoral neck or the intertrochanteric area. Fractures occur at about the same frequency for both areas.

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Hip Anatomy

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Hip Fractures

Rationale

What does the surgeon hope to achieve?

Fixing the broken ends of the hip with metal pins or screws is a fairly simple procedure. The procedure requires only a small incision on the side of the hip, and the pins and screws usually provide a solid connection for the broken bones. Patients are able to move right away after surgery, so they are more likely to avoid the serious complications that can arise with being immobilized in bed.

Most hip fractures would actually heal without surgery, but the problem is that the patient would be in bed for eight to 12 weeks. Surgeons have learned over the years that confining an aging adult to bed for this period of time has a far greater risk of creating serious complications than the surgery required to fix a broken hip. The goal of the hip pinning procedure is to set the bones securely in place, allowing the patient to get out of bed as soon as possible.

The hip pinning procedure is used successfully after most fractures within the femoral neck. When the fractured bones have displaced, however, surgeons do not all agree that the hip pinning procedure is the best choice. This is because displaced fractures can damage the blood supply going to the femoral head, leading to avascular necrosis (AVN), a condition that causes the bone of the femoral head to die. With displaced fractures, the risk of developing AVN is so high that some surgeons may suggest not fixing the fracture but instead removing the f...

Click here to read the rest of this article from eOrthopod.com