Jersey Finger Injury Treatment Frederick MD

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Thomas Francis Ryan, MD
(301) 652-6616
5473 Prince William Ct
Frederick, MD
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Georgetown Univ Sch Of Med, Washington Dc 20007
Graduation Year: 1969

Data Provided By:
Adam Mitchell Mecinski, MD
(301) 739-7790
915 Toll House Ave Ste 309
Frederick, MD
Specialties
Orthopedics, Hand Surgery
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Georgetown Univ Sch Of Med, Washington Dc 20007
Graduation Year: 1993

Data Provided By:
William Bruce Goodman, MD
184 Thomas Johnson Dr
Frederick, MD
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Duke Univ Sch Of Med, Durham Nc 27710
Graduation Year: 1972

Data Provided By:
Edward Lee Lancaster Jr, MD
(717) 569-1002
56 Thomas Johnson Dr
Frederick, MD
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Jefferson Med Coll-Thos Jefferson Univ, Philadelphia Pa 19107
Graduation Year: 1948
Hospital
Hospital: Lancaster Reg Med Ctr, Lancaster, Pa

Data Provided By:
Mark Douglas Chilton, MD
(301) 695-4505
184 Thomas Johnson Dr Ste 104
Frederick, MD
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Jefferson Med Coll-Thos Jefferson Univ, Philadelphia Pa 19107
Graduation Year: 1980

Data Provided By:
C Jeffrey Bowman, DDS
(301) 662-3366
10 W College Ter
Frederick, MD
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Saidi G Osman, MD
52 Thomas Johnson Dr
Frederick, MD
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Nairobi, Coll Of Hlth Sci, Nairobi, Kenya
Graduation Year: 1977

Data Provided By:
Shawn Kay Grandia
(301) 663-9573
52 Thomas Johnson Dr
Frederick, MD
Specialty
Adult Reconstructive Orthopaedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Shao-Huang Chiu, MD
(301) 663-0131
187 Thomas Johnson Dr Ste 1
Frederick, MD
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Taipei Med Coll, Taipei, Taiwan (385-04 Prior 1/71)
Graduation Year: 1966

Data Provided By:
Stanley Yatming Chung, MD
(301) 663-0131
187 Thomas Johnson Dr Ste 1
Frederick, MD
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Coll Of Ohio, Toledo Oh 43699
Graduation Year: 1991

Data Provided By:
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Treatment for Jersey Finger Injury

Jersey finger injury refers to the damage done to the tip of the ring finger when an athlete grabs the shirt (jersey) of another player while that player is pulling away. The hand grasping the jersey is closed in a fist. But the force of the player wearing the shirt pulls the tip of the ring finger into extension.

The result is a rupture of the tendon away from the bone. A piece of the bone may come with the tendon (still attached). This is called an avulsion injury. There can be a bone fracture along with the tendon rupture.

And although it sounds like this is an injury only an athlete can have, in fact, "jersey" finger injuries occur in nonathletes of all ages. Older adults with rheumatoid arthritis or other inflammatory joint conditions experience this injury as well. The same mechanism takes place: forceful extension of the tip of the finger when it is bent that causes the problem.

Any finger can be affected. The ring finger seems to be the most commonly injured digit because of its unique anatomy. It is the weakest of the fingers and least able to move by itself. The flexor digitorum profundus (or FDP) tendon pulls away from the bone more easily than any other finger tendon.

When the fingers are in a fisted position, the ring finger is actually just a tiny bit more forward than the other fingers. So it absorbs more of the force during a pull-away maneuver compared with the other fingers.

Treatment is based on a classification scheme. The injury can be described as a type I, II, III, IV, or V level of retraction. Retraction refers to how far back toward the palm the tendon has recoiled. Type I describes a flexor digitorum profundus tendon (FDP) that has pulled away from the bone and snapped all the way back to the palm.

Type II injury means the tendon has pulled away from the tip of the finger taking a tiny bit of bone with it but without retracting past the next bone. With a type III injury, the tendon has avulsed with a large bone fragment that has gotten caught or entrapped without moving.

Type IV level of retraction has a ruptured tendon with bone avulsion and retraction back toward the palm. And Type V is a ruptured tendon with bone avulsion. The bone where the tendon has pulled away is broken into tiny pieces (called a comminuted fracture). Type V injuries are further divided into Va and Vb. Type Va means the damage is outside the joint (extra-articular). Type Vb tells us there is intraarticular (inside the joint) damage.

When planning the type of surgery to perform, the surgeon evaluates how far back the tendon has retracted, how much bone damage is present, and if the joint is involved. For example, full retraction of the tendon often means the pulley system that holds the tendon in place has also been disrupted. When the force of the injury is enough to strip the tendon from the bone carrying the pulley mechanism along with it, then the blood supply is also affected.

Besides considering t...

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