Knee Replacement Surgery Brookings SD

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David L Meyer, DDS
(605) 692-7511
105 22nd Ave
Brookings, SD
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
John D Ramsay
(605) 697-9500
400 22nd Ave.
Brookings, SD
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Steven Jay Meyer
(605) 217-2615
575 N Sioux Point Rd
Dakota Dunes, SD
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Paul Donald Reynen, MD
(605) 331-5890
810 E 23rd St
Sioux Falls, SD
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Sd Sch Of Med, Vermillion Sd, 57069
Graduation Year: 1986
Hospital
Hospital: Mc Kennan Hospital, Sioux Falls, Sd; Sioux Valley Hospital, Sioux Falls, Sd
Group Practice: Orthopedic & Sports Medicine

Data Provided By:
David W Boyer
(605) 341-1414
7220 S Highway 16
Rapid City, SD
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
John David Ramsay, MD
(605) 692-6236
400 22nd Ave
Brookings, SD
Specialties
Orthopedics, Aerospace Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ok Coll Of Med, Oklahoma City Ok 73190
Graduation Year: 1974
Hospital
Hospital: Brookings Hosp, Brookings, Sd
Group Practice: Brookings Medical Clinic

Data Provided By:
Dr.David Hoversten
(605) 332-1052
1320 S Minnesota Ave # 100
Sioux Falls, SD
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Co Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1973
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Hospital: Mc Kennan Hospital, Sioux Falls, Sd
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
3.8, out of 5 based on 3, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Peter Anthony Looby, MD
(605) 331-5890
810 E 23rd St
Sioux Falls, SD
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Washington Univ Sch Of Med, St Louis Mo 63110
Graduation Year: 1990
Hospital
Hospital: Mc Kennan Hospital, Sioux Falls, Sd; Sioux Valley Hospital, Sioux Falls, Sd
Group Practice: University Physicians Clinics

Data Provided By:
Stuart Edward Fromm, MD
(605) 341-1414
7220 S Highway 16
Rapid City, SD
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Sd Sch Of Med, Vermillion Sd, 57069
Graduation Year: 1990

Data Provided By:
Daniel G Mac Randall, MD
(605) 333-0400
1727 S Cleveland Ave
Sioux Falls, SD
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Sd Sch Of Med, Vermillion Sd, 57069
Graduation Year: 1979

Data Provided By:
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How to Delay That Knee Replacement

Patients with malalignment of the knee that leads to arthritis face some unique challenges. The alignment problems usually mean one side of the knee wears out faster than the other. They can't just have a knee replacement -- or even a unicompartmental procedure. Unicompartmental means just the side that's arthritic is replaced.

And why not? Because the cause of the arthritis is the way the bones fit together to form the knee. In most cases, there is too much pressure on the medial compartment (that's the side of the knee closest to the other knee). Replacing the joint (or the medial half of the joint) doesn't change the alignment issues. That's where a procedure called tibial osteotomy comes in handy.

In this operation, the surgeon removes a wedge- or pie-shaped piece of bone from one side of the tibia<>/i (lower leg bone). The purpose of the osteotomy is to correct the malalignment and take pressure off the medial compartment. There are two ways to do this surgery. Both remove bone from the upper tibia near the knee. The medical term for this type of osteotomy is high tibial osteotomy (HTO).

The first way to do the high tibial osteotomy is called a medial opening wedge tibial osteotomy. Bone is removed from the medial side of the tibia, shifting the weight off the medial compartment and more toward the midline. The two edges of remaining bone are held open with a metal plate or special device called a fixator.

The second method is a lateral closing wedge osteotomy. In this type of osteotomy, bone is taken from the lateral side of the tibia (side away from the other knee). The two edges of the bone are then allowed to shift closer together. The effect is the same as the opening wedge osteotomy: to take pressure off the damaged medial compartment.

There are advantages and disadvantages to each type of osteotomy. Many surgeons prefer the medial open wedge osteotomy because there's less chance of causing shortening of the leg and fewer complications with nerve injuries.

In this study, 106 medial opening wedge high-tibial osteotomies were done for patients who had malalignment leading to arthritis of the medial knee joint. The size of the osteotomy (determined by the amount of bone removed) depended on the overall condition of the knee.

For example, the surgeon looked at the other side of the knee during surgery to see what kind of arthritic changes might have been present there. Most of the time, they tried to correct the alignment to neutral but sometimes it was necessary to overcorrect, shifting weight past the middle to the other side.

The patients were active and interested in delaying joint replacement for as long as possible. In addition to the osteotomy, they also had a microfracture procedure. Microfracture involves drilling tiny holes in the damaged joint surface down to the first level of bone (subchondral bone). Blood seeping into the joint through the holes helps the healing process and ...

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