Magnetic Resonance Imaging Big Rapids MI

This page provides useful content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Magnetic Resonance Imaging. You will find helpful, informative articles about Magnetic Resonance Imaging, including "MRI Is Not a Fortune Teller". You will also find local businesses that provide the products or services that you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Big Rapids, MI that will answer all of your questions about Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

Blase Vitello, MD
(231) 592-4212
605 Oak St
Big Rapids, MI
Specialties
Radiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Rush Med Coll Of Rush Univ, Chicago Il 60612
Graduation Year: 1986

Data Provided By:
Craig Bruce Karsama, MD
405 Winter Ave
Big Rapids, MI
Specialties
Radiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Wayne State Univ Sch Of Med, Detroit Mi 48201
Graduation Year: 1981

Data Provided By:
Peter Shou-cheng Liu
(734) 936-4566
1500 East Medical Center Dr
Ann Arbor, MI
Specialty
Radiology

Data Provided By:
Cheryl Grigorian, MD
(313) 745-2722
110 E Warren Ave
Detroit, MI
Specialties
Radiology
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Wayne State Univ Sch Of Med, Detroit Mi 48201
Graduation Year: 1990

Data Provided By:
Anthony R D'Amico, MD
(734) 615-9016
1500 E Medical Center Dr
Ann Arbor, MI
Specialties
Radiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Wa Sch Of Med, Seattle Wa 98195
Graduation Year: 2002

Data Provided By:
Anthony Stanley Keller, MD
(231) 796-8851
Big Rapids, MI
Specialties
Radiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Wayne State Univ Sch Of Med, Detroit Mi 48201
Graduation Year: 1963

Data Provided By:
Mecosta County Medical Center
(231) 796-8691
605 Oak St
Big Rapids, MI

Data Provided By:
Jeffrey Edward Zapawa, MD
Allen Park, MI
Specialties
Radiology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Wayne State Univ Sch Of Med, Detroit Mi 48201
Graduation Year: 2000

Data Provided By:
Gerald Farrar
(989) 839-3408
4005 Orchard Dr
Midland, MI
Specialty
Neuroradiology

Data Provided By:
Garett A Begeman
(248) 551-0424
3601 W 13 Mile Rd
Royal Oak, MI
Specialty
Radiology

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

MRI Is Not a Fortune Teller

Magnetic resonance imaging--more commonly known as MRI--provides doctors with computerized pictures of tissues inside the body. This machine creates images that look like slices of the area your doctor is interested in. If a person has neck pain, for example, doctors can use MRI to determine exactly where the problem is and where to operate. But can the MRI give an accurate picture of whether the surgery will be a success?

Seventy-three patients requiring surgery for spinal stenosis were studied. Spinal stenosis develops when the tube surrounding the spinal cord narrows. The resulting pressure on the spinal cord causes "myelopathy," a condition that can cause problems with the bowels and bladder, change the way a person walks, and affect a person's ability to use his or her fingers and hands.

Fifty of the patients were men; 23 were women. Their ages ranged from 43 to 81 years old. The average age was 64.

The authors studied MRI scans taken of each patient before surgery. The authors wanted to compare whether certain qualities of the MRI were common in patients who didn't do well after surgery. If patients with a particular finding on the MRI didn't get good results from surgery, doctors might know not to suggest surgery for these kinds of patients.

The results showed that, for the most part, MRIs don't predict how well a patient will do after surgery. The findings of one type of MRI pattern suggested there was greater damage to the spinal cord tissues. Patients with this MRI pattern tended to do poorly after surgery. But since only four of these patients were in the study, the results weren't conclusive.

A combination of the patients' ages, certain MRI patterns, and duration of symptoms seemed to be good predictors of how well the participants would do after surgery. Younger patients whose MRI scans didn't suggest a lot of damage and whose symptoms hadn't lasted as long were more likely to get good results from surgery.

MRIs can give lots o...

Click here to read the rest of this article from eOrthopod.com