Meniscal Surgery Laconia NH

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Arnold Miller
(603) 524-5151
724 N Main St
Laconia, NH
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Kathleen M Robinson, MD FACS
406 Court St
Laconia, NH
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Mcgill
Graduation Year: 1945

Data Provided By:
Glenn Stuart Lieberman, MD
(603) 528-9100
14 Maple St Ste 100
Gilford, NH
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Umdnj-Robt W Johnson Med Sch, New Brunswick Nj 08901
Graduation Year: 1993

Data Provided By:
Jeffrey Allen Clingman, MD
(603) 528-9100
14 Maple St Ste 100
Gilford, NH
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: In Univ Sch Of Med, Indianapolis In 46202
Graduation Year: 1985

Data Provided By:
Donald M Ettelson, MD
(603) 528-9100
432 Shore Dr
Laconia, NH
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Suny-Hlth Sci Ctr At Syracuse, Coll Of Med, Syracuse Ny 13210
Graduation Year: 1956

Data Provided By:
Shawn Paul Mills, MD
(603) 528-9100
14 Maple St
Gilford, NH
Specialties
Orthopedics, Emergency Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tx Med Branch Galveston, Galveston Tx 77550
Graduation Year: 1993

Data Provided By:
Jeffrey A Clingman
(603) 528-9100
14 Maple St
Gilford, NH
Specialty
Hand Surgery

Data Provided By:
Dr.John Grobman
(603) 528-9100
14 Maple St # 100
Gilford, NH
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tx Southwestern Med Ctr At Dallas, Med Sch
Year of Graduation: 1980
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
4.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Arnold R Miller, MD
(603) 524-5151
PO Box 637
Laconia, NH
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ma Med Sch, Worcester Ma 01655
Graduation Year: 1980

Data Provided By:
Kathleen M Robinson, MD
406 Court St
Laconia, NH
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided By:
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Meniscal Surgery

A Patient's Guide to Meniscal Surgery

Introduction

The meniscus is very important to the long-term health of the knee. In the past, surgeons would simply take out part or all of an injured meniscus. But today's surgeons know that removing the meniscus can lead to early knee arthritis. Whenever possible, they try to repair the tear. If the damaged area must be removed, care is taken during surgery to protect the surrounding healthy tissue.

This guide will help you understand

  • what parts of the knee are treated during meniscal surgery
  • what operations are used to treat a damaged meniscus
  • what to expect before and after meniscal surgery

Anatomy

What parts of the knee are involved?

There is one meniscus on each side of the knee joint. The C-shaped medial meniscus is on the inside part of the knee, closest to your other knee. (Medial means closer to the middle of the body.) The U-shaped lateral meniscus is on the outer half of the knee joint. (Lateral means further out from the center of the body.)

The menisci (plural for meniscus) protect the articular cartilage on the surfaces of the thighbone (femur) and the shinbone (tibia). Articular cartilage is the smooth, slippery material that covers the ends of the bones that make up the knee joint. The articular cartilage allows the joint surfaces to slide against one another without damage to either surface.

Most of the meniscus is avascular, meaning no blood vessels go to it. Only its outer rim gets a small supply of blood. Doctors call this area the red zone. The ends of a few vessels in the red zone may actually travel inward to the middle section, the red-white zone. The inner portion of the meniscus, closest to the center of the knee, is called the white zone. It has no blood vessels at all. Although a tear in the outer rim has a good chance of healing, damage further in toward the center of the meniscus will not heal on its own.

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Knee Anatomy

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Meniscal Injuries

Rationale

What does my surgeon hope to accomplish?

The meniscus is a pad of cartilage that acts like a shock absorber to protect the knee. The meniscus is also vital for knee stability. When the meniscus is damaged or is surgically removed, the knee joint can become loose, or unstable. Without the protection and stability of a healthy meniscus, the surfaces of the knee can suffer wear and tear, leading to a condition called osteoarthritis.

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Knee Osteoarthritis

Most tears of the meniscus do not heal on their own. A small tear in the outer rim (the red zone) has a good chance of healing. However, tears in the inner part of the meniscus often require surgery. When tears in this area are causing symptoms, they tend to get bigger. This puts the articular cartilage on the surfaces of the knee joint at risk of injury.

Surgeons aim to save the men...

Click here to read the rest of this article from eOrthopod.com