Meniscal Surgery Valley AL

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Patrick Lee Martin, MD
(334) 756-2207
11 Medical Park
Valley, AL
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Al Sch Of Med, Birmingham Al 35294
Graduation Year: 1994

Data Provided By:
Robert J McAlindon
(334) 528-2663
2000 Pepperell Parkway
Opelika, AL
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
David William Scott, MD
(334) 749-8303
PO Box 2125
Opelika, AL
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Fl Coll Of Med, Gainesville Fl 32610
Graduation Year: 1977

Data Provided By:
Benj Franklin Thomas III, MD
(334) 749-8303
PO Box 2125
Opelika, AL
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Emory Univ Sch Of Med, Atlanta Ga 30322
Graduation Year: 1973

Data Provided By:
Todd Michael Sheils, MD
(205) 934-4668
121 N 20th St Ste 18
Opelika, AL
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Al Sch Of Med, Birmingham Al 35294
Graduation Year: 1998

Data Provided By:
Dr.Robert Mcalindon
(334) 528-2663
2000 Pepperell Parkway
Opelika, AL
Gender
M
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 2, reviews.

Data Provided By:
David William Scott
(334) 749-8303
121 N 20th St
Opelika, AL
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
James Rodman Whatley
(334) 749-8303
121 North 20th Street # 18
Opelika, AL
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
James Rodman Whatley, MD
(334) 749-8303
PO Box 2125
Opelika, AL
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Al Sch Of Med, Birmingham Al 35294
Graduation Year: 1974

Data Provided By:
Dr.Frazier Jones
(334) 749-8303
121 N 20th St # 18
Opelika, AL
Gender
M
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
1.0, out of 5 based on 2, reviews.

Data Provided By:
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Meniscal Surgery

A Patient's Guide to Meniscal Surgery

Introduction

The meniscus is very important to the long-term health of the knee. In the past, surgeons would simply take out part or all of an injured meniscus. But today's surgeons know that removing the meniscus can lead to early knee arthritis. Whenever possible, they try to repair the tear. If the damaged area must be removed, care is taken during surgery to protect the surrounding healthy tissue.

This guide will help you understand

  • what parts of the knee are treated during meniscal surgery
  • what operations are used to treat a damaged meniscus
  • what to expect before and after meniscal surgery

Anatomy

What parts of the knee are involved?

There is one meniscus on each side of the knee joint. The C-shaped medial meniscus is on the inside part of the knee, closest to your other knee. (Medial means closer to the middle of the body.) The U-shaped lateral meniscus is on the outer half of the knee joint. (Lateral means further out from the center of the body.)

The menisci (plural for meniscus) protect the articular cartilage on the surfaces of the thighbone (femur) and the shinbone (tibia). Articular cartilage is the smooth, slippery material that covers the ends of the bones that make up the knee joint. The articular cartilage allows the joint surfaces to slide against one another without damage to either surface.

Most of the meniscus is avascular, meaning no blood vessels go to it. Only its outer rim gets a small supply of blood. Doctors call this area the red zone. The ends of a few vessels in the red zone may actually travel inward to the middle section, the red-white zone. The inner portion of the meniscus, closest to the center of the knee, is called the white zone. It has no blood vessels at all. Although a tear in the outer rim has a good chance of healing, damage further in toward the center of the meniscus will not heal on its own.

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Knee Anatomy

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Meniscal Injuries

Rationale

What does my surgeon hope to accomplish?

The meniscus is a pad of cartilage that acts like a shock absorber to protect the knee. The meniscus is also vital for knee stability. When the meniscus is damaged or is surgically removed, the knee joint can become loose, or unstable. Without the protection and stability of a healthy meniscus, the surfaces of the knee can suffer wear and tear, leading to a condition called osteoarthritis.

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Knee Osteoarthritis

Most tears of the meniscus do not heal on their own. A small tear in the outer rim (the red zone) has a good chance of healing. However, tears in the inner part of the meniscus often require surgery. When tears in this area are causing symptoms, they tend to get bigger. This puts the articular cartilage on the surfaces of the knee joint at risk of injury.

Surgeons aim to save the men...

Click here to read the rest of this article from eOrthopod.com