Mosaicplasty Duluth GA

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Lawrence A. Bircoll, M.D.
(770) 491-3003
2680 Lawrenceville Highway
Decatur, GA
Business
Resurgens Orthopedics
Specialties
Orthopedics
Insurance
Insurance Plans Accepted: We accept most insurance plans

Doctor Information
Primary Hospital: Dekalb Medical Center
Residency Training: Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan
Medical School: University of Michigan School of Medicine,
Additional Information
Member Organizations: American Academy of Orthopaedics Medical Association of Georgia Atlanta Orthoapedic Society
Languages Spoken: English

Data Provided By:
F. daniel Koch, M.D.
(770) 491-3003
2680 Lawrenceville Highway
Decatur, GA
Business
Resurgens Orthopedics
Specialties
Orthopedics, General Orthopaedics, Adult Spine Surgery
Insurance
Insurance Plans Accepted: Accept most insurance plans

Doctor Information
Primary Hospital: Dekalb Medical Center
Residency Training: University of Louisville
Medical School: Duke University,
Additional Information
Member Organizations: Fellow, American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons
Languages Spoken: English

Data Provided By:
Timothy Scott Maughon, MD
(770) 813-8888
3855 Pleasant Hill Rd Ste 470
Duluth, GA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Coll Of Ga Sch Of Med, Augusta Ga 30912
Graduation Year: 1986
Hospital
Hospital: Gwinnett Med Ctr, Lawrenceville, Ga
Group Practice: Sports Medicine & Orthopedic

Data Provided By:
Jesse Edward Seidman, MD
(770) 889-0891
3540 Duluth Park Ln Ste 220
Duluth, GA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Suny-Hlth Sci Ctr At Syracuse, Coll Of Med, Syracuse Ny 13210
Graduation Year: 1986

Data Provided By:
Mark Cullen, MD
Duluth, GA
Specialty
Orthopaedic Sugeon

Data Provided By:
Sami O. Khan, M.D.
(770) 491-3003
2680 Lawrencevill Highway
Decatur, GA
Business
Resrugens Orthopaedics
Specialties
Orthopedics, Arthroscopic and Reconstructive Surgery of the Shoulder, Elbow and Knee, Sports Medicine, General Orthopaedics
Insurance
Insurance Plans Accepted: We accept most insurance plans

Doctor Information
Primary Hospital: Emory Eastside Hospital
Residency Training: New York University Hospital fo rJoint Disease
Medical School: Emory University School of Medicine,
Additional Information
Member Organizations: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, Arthroscopy Association of North America, American Orthopaedic Society of Sports Medicine
Awards: Associate Team Physician, New York Mets MLB 2003-2004 Team Physician, Mississippi Valley State Delta Devils 2006-2007 Associate Physician, Alvin Ailey Dance Theater New York, 2004 Author of multiple textbook chapters involving shoulder and elbow injuri
Languages Spoken: English,Spanish

Data Provided By:
Paul L Ouellette, DDS
(770) 622-9291
3530 Mall Blvd Ste B
Duluth, GA
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
George Thurman Mitchell, DDS
(770) 923-8333
3709 Buford Hwy
Duluth, GA
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Harold E Hickam, DDS
(478) 987-6522
PO Box 1592
Duluth, GA
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Robert David Rockfeld, MD
(770) 995-3300
3490 Pleasant Hill Rd
Duluth, GA
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Jefferson Med Coll-Thos Jefferson Univ, Philadelphia Pa 19107
Graduation Year: 1968

Data Provided By:
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Cartilage Repair in Sports Athletes Using Mosaicplasty

Injuries, defects, lesions, or tears of any kind in the joint cartilage can end a sports athlete's career. Today, there are improved ways to treat cartilage injuries, especially in the knee. One of those methods is called mosaicplasty. This article reviews the uses and long-term results of mosaicplasty in an athletic population.

What is mosaicplasty? It's a form of osteochondral autografting. That doesn't really explain anything, does it? Let's start with the last part of the term: grafting tissue is the moving of some type of soft tissue from one spot to another. It could be ligament, tendon, muscle, or as in this case, cartilage. Autografting tells us the donor tissue being harvested to repair the problem is coming from the patient himself.

Osteochondral can be broken down into two words: osteo for bone and chondral meaning cartilage. So with osteochondral, we have cartilage that has pulled away from the joint with the underlying next layer of bone still attached. We call this kind of damage a full-thickness defect. That is the injury side of things.

Now the repair side of the problem: mosaicplasty. During this procedure, the surgeon harvests cartilage and bone from an area of the knee that doesn't get much action and isn't under the pressure of constant weight bearing. The donor or graft is smoothed and shaped to fill in the defect site. Sometimes only one donor plug is needed but some patients in this particular study had as many as nine grafted pieces.

What are the advantages of this treatment? And who is considered a good candidate for the procedure? Mosaicplasty can help save the joint and protect it from further wear and tear around the defect site. Normal joint biomechanics can be restored with this technique and get the athlete back into full sports participation sooner than later. With seasonal sports and a limited amount of playing time, faster return-to-sports can be a huge benefit of a successful mosaicplasty.

Among the athletes with cartilage damage, who can benefit? The results of this study confirm what other studies have shown. Younger athletes who have smaller (and fewer) lesions seem to do the best. But location of the lesion was a key risk factor for successful outcomes. Lesions located on the femoral condyles (large round knobs at the end of the femur (thighbone) seem to respond better than damage or defects to the patella (kneecap).

Athletes from all types of sports were included with no real difference in results based on their sports injuries. Soccer players, handball, water polo, wrestling, gymnasts, and many others had equally good results. Only a small number of patients suffered from post-operative complications such as hemorrhage, infection, or persistent pain and swelling. At least in this study, sex (male versus female) was not a significant factor.

The researchers found that there were some other specific factors that influenced success or failure. For example, smaller...

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