Mosaicplasty Spanish Fork UT

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Kendall J Barrowes, DDS
(801) 798-1994
82 E 900 N
Spanish Fork, UT
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
John Robert Schouten, DDS
(801) 491-9372
378 E 400 S Ste 2
Springville, UT
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
James Marden Broadbent, DDS
(801) 375-7088
777 N 500 W Ste 205
Provo, UT
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Kirt Kimball, MD
Provo, UT
Specialty
Orthopaedic Sugeon

Data Provided By:
DeVon A Nelson
(801) 373-7350
1055 N 500 W
Provo, UT
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Brian F Trapnell, DDS
(801) 489-9475
225 E 400 S
Springville, UT
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Reid R Swenson, DDS
(801) 766-5500
680 E Main St # 201
Springville, UT
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Lauren Dean Dalzen, DDS
(801) 375-3355
30 S 300 E
Provo, UT
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Dr.JONATHAN FAUX
1055 North 500 West #112
Provo, UT
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: George Washington Univ Sch Of Med & Hlth Sci
Year of Graduation: 1997
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Douglas Schow Jr, MD
(801) 374-9053
1055 N 300 W Ste 203
Provo, UT
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ut Sch Of Med, Salt Lake Cty Ut 84132
Graduation Year: 1972
Hospital
Hospital: Utah Valley Reg Med Ctr, Provo, Ut

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Cartilage Repair in Sports Athletes Using Mosaicplasty

Injuries, defects, lesions, or tears of any kind in the joint cartilage can end a sports athlete's career. Today, there are improved ways to treat cartilage injuries, especially in the knee. One of those methods is called mosaicplasty. This article reviews the uses and long-term results of mosaicplasty in an athletic population.

What is mosaicplasty? It's a form of osteochondral autografting. That doesn't really explain anything, does it? Let's start with the last part of the term: grafting tissue is the moving of some type of soft tissue from one spot to another. It could be ligament, tendon, muscle, or as in this case, cartilage. Autografting tells us the donor tissue being harvested to repair the problem is coming from the patient himself.

Osteochondral can be broken down into two words: osteo for bone and chondral meaning cartilage. So with osteochondral, we have cartilage that has pulled away from the joint with the underlying next layer of bone still attached. We call this kind of damage a full-thickness defect. That is the injury side of things.

Now the repair side of the problem: mosaicplasty. During this procedure, the surgeon harvests cartilage and bone from an area of the knee that doesn't get much action and isn't under the pressure of constant weight bearing. The donor or graft is smoothed and shaped to fill in the defect site. Sometimes only one donor plug is needed but some patients in this particular study had as many as nine grafted pieces.

What are the advantages of this treatment? And who is considered a good candidate for the procedure? Mosaicplasty can help save the joint and protect it from further wear and tear around the defect site. Normal joint biomechanics can be restored with this technique and get the athlete back into full sports participation sooner than later. With seasonal sports and a limited amount of playing time, faster return-to-sports can be a huge benefit of a successful mosaicplasty.

Among the athletes with cartilage damage, who can benefit? The results of this study confirm what other studies have shown. Younger athletes who have smaller (and fewer) lesions seem to do the best. But location of the lesion was a key risk factor for successful outcomes. Lesions located on the femoral condyles (large round knobs at the end of the femur (thighbone) seem to respond better than damage or defects to the patella (kneecap).

Athletes from all types of sports were included with no real difference in results based on their sports injuries. Soccer players, handball, water polo, wrestling, gymnasts, and many others had equally good results. Only a small number of patients suffered from post-operative complications such as hemorrhage, infection, or persistent pain and swelling. At least in this study, sex (male versus female) was not a significant factor.

The researchers found that there were some other specific factors that influenced success or failure. For example, smaller...

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