Oncologists Kailua Kona HI

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Oncologists. You will find informative articles about Oncologists, including "What To Do About Benign Tumors of the Hand". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Kailua Kona, HI that can help answer your questions about Oncologists.

Christopher Joseph Trauth, MD
(808) 322-6910
PO Box 1508
Kailua Kona, HI
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: La State Univ Sch Of Med In New Orleans, New Orleans La 70112
Graduation Year: 1974

Data Provided By:
Christopher Trauth
(409) 899-7180
690 N 14th St FL 3
Kailua Kona, HI
Specialty
Medical Oncology
Associated Hospitals
Abilene Hem Onc Grp

Norman H Leve, MR
(808) 255-6542
1168 Kahului St
Honolulu, HI
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided By:
Jonathan Karl Cho, MD
(808) 524-6115
1329 Lusitana St Ste 307
Honolulu, HI
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Hematology-Internal Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Hi John A Burns Sch Of Med, Honolulu Hi 96822
Graduation Year: 1976

Data Provided By:
Theodore K Yang, MD
(808) 235-8781
46-001 Kamehameha Hwy Ste 206
Kaneohe, HI
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Radiation Oncology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tx Med Branch Galveston, Galveston Tx 77550
Graduation Year: 1993
Hospital
Hospital: Tomball Regional Hospital, Tomball, Tx; University Of Texas Medical Br, Galveston, Tx

Data Provided By:
Larry W Henry
(808) 322-6948
79-1019 Haukapila St
Kealakekua, HI
Specialty
Radiation Oncology

Data Provided By:
Glenn Geoffrey Preston, MD
Aiea, HI
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Mo, Columbia Sch Of Med, Columbia Mo 65212
Graduation Year: 1995

Data Provided By:
Randal James Liu, MD
(808) 522-4333
888 S King St
Honolulu, HI
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Jefferson Med Coll-Thos Jefferson Univ, Philadelphia Pa 19107
Graduation Year: 1987

Data Provided By:
Jennifer Brannon F, MS
(808) 893-6090
1319 Punahou St Ste 640
Honolulu, HI
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided By:
Danny Morito Takanishi, MD
(808) 586-2920
1356 Lusitana St Fl 6
Honolulu, HI
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Hi John A Burns Sch Of Med, Honolulu Hi 96822
Graduation Year: 1987

Data Provided By:
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What To Do About Benign Tumors of the Hand

Benign tumors may not spread and cause death but they can create significant problems just the same. Tumors of the hand (the focus of this article) can wrap themselves around nerves, cut off blood supply, and cause fractures. Undiagnosed and untreated, they can invade surrounding soft tissues and eat away at the bone causing significant loss of motion, deformity, and disability.

Although benign tumors of the hand are fairly common, there are no large studies comparing one treatment to another. Therefore, today's modern treatment is largely based on the hand surgeon's experience and what little information can be gleaned from case studies published in medical journals.

That's why these two hand surgeons combined their knowledge and expertise in presenting an up-to-date review on benign tumors of the bone and soft tissues of the hand. They base their recommendations on studies that are available and on their own experiences. The authors point out the fact that many tumors in the hand are treated based on similar tumors in other parts of the body, not necessarily from experience or evidence with hand tumors.

Benign tumors under consideration can affect the bone (e.g., osteoid osteoma, cysts, giant cell tumors), cartilage (e.g., osteochondroma, enchondroma, periosteal chondroma, fibromas), fat/connective tissue (e.g., lipomas, giant cell tumor of tendon sheath), nerves (e.g., Schwannoma, neurofibroma), and blood vessels (e.g., glomus tumor).

The authors discuss each one of these benign tumors, their clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment. The diagnosis is made when patients observe an odd lump under the skin or hard bump on the bone. Concern about what this might be brings them into see the doctor. Pain, swelling, and local tenderness are the most common symptoms (when symptoms are present).

X-rays or other diagnostic imaging tests (CT scan, MRI) and biopsy help make the diagnosis. Many times, it's quite obvious that the problem is a benign tumor of the hand so biopsy isn't necessary.

Conservative (nonoperative) care may be possible for some tumors. Aspirin for pain management seems to work well for osteoid osteomas (benign bone tumors). Radiofrequency ablation (a heat treatment) has been tried for other tumors of this type elsewhere in the body.

A few studies have been published with mixed results of radiofrequency ablation with hand tumors. The structures of the hand are so small, it's easy to damage the small bones of the hand, as well as the tiny nerves, and blood vessels.

But many tumors must be carefully removed, a procedure called surgical excision. If a large amount of bone is removed, bone replacement called grafting may be needed to fill in the hole. When the cartilage is involved, the surgeon does everything possible to preserve the joint surface.

If bone fracture has already occurred (and that's why the patient was diagnosed), treatment involves removing the tumor as well as healing t...

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