Oncologists North Platte NE

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Oncologists. You will find informative articles about Oncologists, including "What To Do About Benign Tumors of the Hand". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in North Platte, NE that can help answer your questions about Oncologists.

Merla E Puray, MD
301 S Oak St Ste D
North Platte, NE
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided By:
Ifran Vaziri
(308) 696-8000
601 W Leota St
North Platte, NE
Specialty
Medical Oncology

Data Provided By:
Todd Eugene Hlavaty, MD
(800) 662-0011
601 W Leota St
North Platte, NE
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer), Radiation Oncology
Gender
Male
Languages
Spanish
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ar Coll Of Med, Little Rock Ar 72205
Graduation Year: 1991

Data Provided By:
Leanna Timperley
(505) 955-7900
1311 S Oak St
North Platte, NE
Specialty
Hematology-Oncology
Associated Hospitals
Great Plains Regional Med Ctr

Addison Tolentino
601 W Leota St
North Platte, NE
Specialty
Hematology-Oncology

Dr.Todd Hlavaty
(308) 696-7741
601 West Leota Street
North Platte, NE
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ar Coll Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1991
Speciality
Oncologist
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Leanna J Scott Timperley, MD
(505) 955-7900
1311 S Oak St Ste D
North Platte, NE
Specialties
Oncology (Cancer)
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ne Coll Of Med, Omaha Ne 68198
Graduation Year: 1992

Data Provided By:
Todd Hlavaty
(800) 662-0011
PO Box 1167
North Platte, NE
Specialty
Radiation Oncology
Associated Hospitals
Radiation Therapy

Michael Norgard
(800) 223-3064
4145 Carmichael Rd
North Platte, NE
Specialty
Hematologist, Oncologist
Associated Hospitals
Callahan Cancer Ctr

DeBorah A Perry
(402) 354-2100
8303 Dodge St
Omaha, NE
Specialty
Hematology

Data Provided By:
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What To Do About Benign Tumors of the Hand

Benign tumors may not spread and cause death but they can create significant problems just the same. Tumors of the hand (the focus of this article) can wrap themselves around nerves, cut off blood supply, and cause fractures. Undiagnosed and untreated, they can invade surrounding soft tissues and eat away at the bone causing significant loss of motion, deformity, and disability.

Although benign tumors of the hand are fairly common, there are no large studies comparing one treatment to another. Therefore, today's modern treatment is largely based on the hand surgeon's experience and what little information can be gleaned from case studies published in medical journals.

That's why these two hand surgeons combined their knowledge and expertise in presenting an up-to-date review on benign tumors of the bone and soft tissues of the hand. They base their recommendations on studies that are available and on their own experiences. The authors point out the fact that many tumors in the hand are treated based on similar tumors in other parts of the body, not necessarily from experience or evidence with hand tumors.

Benign tumors under consideration can affect the bone (e.g., osteoid osteoma, cysts, giant cell tumors), cartilage (e.g., osteochondroma, enchondroma, periosteal chondroma, fibromas), fat/connective tissue (e.g., lipomas, giant cell tumor of tendon sheath), nerves (e.g., Schwannoma, neurofibroma), and blood vessels (e.g., glomus tumor).

The authors discuss each one of these benign tumors, their clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment. The diagnosis is made when patients observe an odd lump under the skin or hard bump on the bone. Concern about what this might be brings them into see the doctor. Pain, swelling, and local tenderness are the most common symptoms (when symptoms are present).

X-rays or other diagnostic imaging tests (CT scan, MRI) and biopsy help make the diagnosis. Many times, it's quite obvious that the problem is a benign tumor of the hand so biopsy isn't necessary.

Conservative (nonoperative) care may be possible for some tumors. Aspirin for pain management seems to work well for osteoid osteomas (benign bone tumors). Radiofrequency ablation (a heat treatment) has been tried for other tumors of this type elsewhere in the body.

A few studies have been published with mixed results of radiofrequency ablation with hand tumors. The structures of the hand are so small, it's easy to damage the small bones of the hand, as well as the tiny nerves, and blood vessels.

But many tumors must be carefully removed, a procedure called surgical excision. If a large amount of bone is removed, bone replacement called grafting may be needed to fill in the hole. When the cartilage is involved, the surgeon does everything possible to preserve the joint surface.

If bone fracture has already occurred (and that's why the patient was diagnosed), treatment involves removing the tumor as well as healing t...

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