Osteoporosis Specialists Providence RI

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Osteoporosis Specialists. You will find informative articles about Osteoporosis Specialists, including "What's Your Risk of Osteoporosis?". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Providence, RI that can help answer your questions about Osteoporosis Specialists.

William Trafford Mason, MD
(401) 335-1234
1 Hoppin St
Providence, RI
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Cincinnati Coll Of Med, Cincinnati Oh 45267
Graduation Year: 1974

Data Provided By:
William T Mason
(401) 793-8400
1 Hoppin St
Providence, RI
Specialty
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology

Data Provided By:
John Michael Conte, MD
(401) 351-2280
49 Seekonk St
Providence, RI
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ct Sch Of Med, Farmington Ct 06032
Graduation Year: 1978

Data Provided By:
Yousaf Ali, MD
(401) 351-2280
49 Seekonk St
Providence, RI
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of London, Royal Free Hosp Sch Med (See 917-34)
Graduation Year: 1992

Data Provided By:
David Kadmon, MD
(401) 456-2069
341 Cole Ave
Providence, RI
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: A Einstein Coll Of Med Of Yeshiva Univ,
Graduation Year: 1992

Data Provided By:
Bradley J Bloom
(401) 793-8560
1 Hoppin St
Providence, RI
Specialty
Rheumatology

Data Provided By:
Paul Hector Martin, MD
(401) 743-8574
262 Cypress St
Providence, RI
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Laval, Fac De Med, Sainte-Foy, Que, Canada
Graduation Year: 1956

Data Provided By:
Marven Leftick, MD
(401) 351-2280
49 Seekonk St
Providence, RI
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Mc Gill Univ, Fac Of Med, Montreal, Que, Canada
Graduation Year: 1974

Data Provided By:
Harold Milton Horwitz, MD
(401) 351-2280
57 Hazard Ave
Providence, RI
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Tufts Univ Sch Of Med, Boston Ma 02111
Graduation Year: 1968
Hospital
Hospital: Memorial Hospital Of R I, Pawtucket, Ri; Rhode Island Hospital, Providence, Ri; Miriam Hospital, Providence, Ri
Group Practice: Rheumatology Associates

Data Provided By:
Stuart Terry Schwartz, MD
(401) 274-6540
2 Dudley St Ste 370
Providence, RI
Specialties
Internal Medicine, Rheumatology
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Umdnj-Robt W Johnson Med Sch, New Brunswick Nj 08901
Graduation Year: 1984

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

What's Your Risk of Osteoporosis?

Most of us who are 50 years old or older are acutely aware of the many changes we see in our bodies. The mirror shows us everyday that we ain't what we used to be. But there are some things we can't see that may need your attention. One of those is a condition called osteoporosis. You've probably already heard about it but may not think it applies to you.

Osteoporosis is a decrease in bone mass. The bone is less dense, a concept referred to as a decrease in bone mineral density (BMD) -- a thinning of the bone, so-to-speak. Left untreated, bones can become brittle and break causing bone fractures and other problems.

You may not think this applies to you, but half of all adults over the age of 50 are affected. How can you tell if you have osteoporosis? Your primary care physician is the best person to evaluate and advise you. But educating yourself about this skeletal disease, recognizing your risk factors, and practicing some prevention is a very good idea.

First, who is at risk? Are you? According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF), there are two categories of risk factors: lifestyle factors and medical risk factors. Lifestyle factors include things like too much alcohol, tobacco, caffeine, and antacids (aluminum). Not enough calcium, vitamin D, and physical activity add to your risk. These are all considered modifiable risk factors, meaning you can do something about them to reduce your risk.

Some of the medical risk factors are nonmodifiable. For example, there's not much you can do about your age or sex (women are at greater risk than men). A previous fracture, poor vision (contributing to falls), poor balance, and some medications also increase your medical risk of decreased bone mass. Some of these are modifiable, while others are not. Your physician will help you sort out which are your risk factors and how to reduce your risk as much as possible.

Although older Caucasian (white) women (especially after menopause) are the group affected most often, anyone of either sex (male or female) and of any color (racial or ethnic background) can develop osteoporosis. In fact, there is evidence now that not enough calcium and having diabetes mellitus has bumped up the number of Hispanic women affected by osteoporosis.

Men can also develop osteoporosis. This is especially true if they are over 70 years old or have low levels of testosterone hormone and any of the other risk factors already mentioned. Caucasian men are affected most often (seven per cent), followed by African American men (five per cent), and Hispanic men (three per cent). Those figures compare with 20 per cent for both Caucasian and Asian women.

If you have any of these risk factors, you should be evaluated. The next question is what kind of testing is available to see if you do have osteoporosis? The gold standard (number one tool used) is still dual-energy X-ay absorptiometry (DXA, pronounced Dex-uh) scanning. It's painless, noninvasiv...

Click here to read the rest of this article from eOrthopod.com