Osteoporosis Treatment Sun City West AZ

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Kit C McCalla, DO
(602) 424-0935
10815 W McDowell Rd
Avondale, AZ
Business
Arizona College of Orthopedic Surgeons PC
Specialties
Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Joseph A Drazek, MD
Sun City West, AZ
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided By:
Robert Ronald Karpman, MD
(623) 584-5626
14506 W Granite Valley Dr Ste 205
Sun City West, AZ
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Pa Sch Of Med, Philadelphia Pa 19104
Graduation Year: 1977
Hospital
Hospital: Maricopa Med Ctr, Phoenix, Az
Group Practice: Sun Valley Orthopaedic & Hand

Data Provided By:
Dr.David Jacofsky
(623) 537-5600
14420 W Meeker Blvd # 300
Sun City West, AZ
Gender
M
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Online Appt Scheduling: Yes
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
4.8, out of 5 based on 10, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Andrew Joshua Appel
(623) 537-5600
14420 W Meeker Blvd
Sun City West, AZ
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery, Orthopaedic Surgery of the Spine

Data Provided By:
Jon Edwin Gelsey, MD
(623) 537-5600
14420 W Meeker Blvd Ste 300
Sun City West, AZ
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Il Coll Of Med, Chicago Il 60680
Graduation Year: 1970

Data Provided By:
Mark Doran Campbell, MD
(623) 537-5600
14420 W Meeker Blvd Ste 300
Sun City West, AZ
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Albany Med Coll, Albany Ny 12208
Graduation Year: 1995

Data Provided By:
Thomas P Foerster
(623) 583-5270
14416 W Meeker Blvd
Sun City West, AZ
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Dr.ROBERT CERCEK
(623) 537-5600
14520 West Granite Valley Drive #210
Sun City West, AZ
Gender
M
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Robert Charles Waldrip, MD
(623) 584-5626
14506 W Granite Valley Dr Ste 205
Sun City West, AZ
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Auto De Guadalajara, Fac De Med, Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico
Graduation Year: 1979

Data Provided By:
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Osteoporosis

A Patient's Guide to Osteoporosis

Introduction

Osteoporosis is a very common disorder affecting the skeleton. In a patient with osteoporosis, the bones begin losing their minerals and support beams, leaving the skeleton brittle and prone to fractures.

In the U.S., 10 million individuals are estimated to already have the disease and almost 34 million more have low bone mass, placing them at increased risk for osteoporosis. Of the 10 million Americans affected by osteoporosis, eight million are women and two million are men. Most of them over age 65.

Bone fractures caused by osteoporosis have become very costly. Half of all bone fractures are related to osteoporosis. More than 300,000 hip fractures occur in the United States every year. A person with a hip fracture has a 20 percent chance of dying within six months as a result of the fracture. Many people who have a fracture related to osteoporosis spend considerable time in the hospital and in rehabilitation. Often, they need to spend some time in a nursing home.

This guide will help you understand

  • what happens to your bones when you have osteoporosis
  • how doctors diagnose the condition
  • what you can do to slow or stop bone loss

Anatomy

What happens to bones with osteoporosis?

Most people think of their bones as completely solid and unchanging. This is not true. Your bones are constantly changing as they respond to the way you use your body. As muscles get stronger, the bones underneath them get stronger, too. As muscles lose strength, the bones underneath them weaken. Changes in hormone levels or the immune system can also change the way the bones degenerate and rebuild themselves.

As a child, your bones are constantly growing and getting denser. At about age 25, you hit your peak bone mass. As an adult, you can help maintain this peak bone mass by staying active and eating a diet with enough calories, calcium, and vitamin D. But maintaining this bone mass gets more difficult as we get older. Age makes building bone mass more difficult. In women, the loss of estrogen at menopause can cause the bones to lose density very rapidly.

The bone cells responsible for building new bone are called osteoblasts. Stimulating the creation of osteoblasts helps your body build bone and improve bone density. The bone cells involved in degeneration of the bones are called osteoclasts. Interfering with the action of the osteoclasts can slow down bone loss.

In high-turnover osteoporosis, the osteoclasts reabsorb bone cells very quickly. The osteoblasts can't produce bone cells fast enough to keep up with the osteoclasts. The result is a loss of bone mass, particularly trabecular bone--the spongy bone inside vertebral bones and at the end of long bones. Postmenopausal women tend to have high-turnover osteoporosis (also known as primary type one osteoporosis). This relates to their sudden decrease in production of estrogen after menopause. Bones weakened by t...

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