Osteoporosis Treatment Waupaca WI

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David Michael Henneghan, MD
(715) 342-7950
190 Grand Seasons Dr
Waupaca, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Mi State Univ Coll Of Human Med, East Lansing Mi 48824
Graduation Year: 1984
Hospital
Hospital: St Michaels Hospital, Stevens Point, Wi
Group Practice: Ministry Health Care At Rice Medical Center; Rice Medical Center Ministry Health Care

Data Provided By:
James Henry De Weerd, MD
(715) 345-5100
190 Grand Seasons Dr
Waupaca, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Bowman Gray Sch Of Med Of Wake Forest Univ, Winston-Salem Nc 27157
Graduation Year: 1972

Data Provided By:
Sean P Keane MD
(414) 277-1155
2015 E Newport Ave
Milwaukee, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Fredric S Kreul, DDS
(715) 344-6499
1077 Wilshire Blvd
Stevens Point, WI
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Steven Lewis Oreck, MD
(608) 287-2700
1 S Park St
Madison, WI
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: La State Univ Sch Of Med In New Orleans, New Orleans La 70112
Graduation Year: 1979

Data Provided By:
Kim Harold Lulloff, MD
Waupaca, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Coll Of Wi, Milwaukee Wi 53226
Graduation Year: 1960

Data Provided By:
Dr. Rodney Lefler
Neuroscience Group of NE Wisconsin
920-725-9373 or toll free 800-201-1194
1305 W. American Drive
Neenah, WI
Specialty
Chiropractor
Conditions
Cervical spine disorders,Degenerative disc disease,Degenerative spinal conditions,Herniated disc / bulging disc,Lumbar spine disorders,Muscle pain / muscle strain,Neck pain,Sciatica / radiculopathy,Scoliosis and deformity,Spinal stenosis,Spondylolisthesis,Sports injuries,Thoracic spine disorders,Whiplash
Treatments
Exercise,McKenzie Method,Musculoskeletal manipulation,Physical therapy,Rehabilitation,Sports medicine,Strength and Conditioning
Proffesional Affiliation
Wisconsin Chiropractic Association,National Strength and Conditioning Association

Troy Lyman Berg, MD
(715) 832-1400
4212 Southtown Dr
Eau Claire, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Mn Med Sch-Minneapolis, Minneapolis Mn 55455
Graduation Year: 1993
Hospital
Hospital: Sacred Heart Hospital, Eau Claire, Wi; St Josephs Hospital, Chippewa Fls, Wi; Indianhead Med Ctr, Shell Lake, Wi
Group Practice: Chippewa Valley Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Richard A Hovda, DDS
(715) 842-5459
519 N 17Th Ave
Wausau, WI
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Marc Hanson Anderson, MD
(920) 468-0246
704 S Webster Ave
Green Bay, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: In Univ Sch Of Med, Indianapolis In 46202
Graduation Year: 1980
Hospital
Hospital: St Vincents Hospital, Green Bay, Wi; Bellin Mem Hosp, Green Bay, Wi
Group Practice: Orthopaedic Associates Of Green Bay Sc

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Osteoporosis

A Patient's Guide to Osteoporosis

Introduction

Osteoporosis is a very common disorder affecting the skeleton. In a patient with osteoporosis, the bones begin losing their minerals and support beams, leaving the skeleton brittle and prone to fractures.

In the U.S., 10 million individuals are estimated to already have the disease and almost 34 million more have low bone mass, placing them at increased risk for osteoporosis. Of the 10 million Americans affected by osteoporosis, eight million are women and two million are men. Most of them over age 65.

Bone fractures caused by osteoporosis have become very costly. Half of all bone fractures are related to osteoporosis. More than 300,000 hip fractures occur in the United States every year. A person with a hip fracture has a 20 percent chance of dying within six months as a result of the fracture. Many people who have a fracture related to osteoporosis spend considerable time in the hospital and in rehabilitation. Often, they need to spend some time in a nursing home.

This guide will help you understand

  • what happens to your bones when you have osteoporosis
  • how doctors diagnose the condition
  • what you can do to slow or stop bone loss

Anatomy

What happens to bones with osteoporosis?

Most people think of their bones as completely solid and unchanging. This is not true. Your bones are constantly changing as they respond to the way you use your body. As muscles get stronger, the bones underneath them get stronger, too. As muscles lose strength, the bones underneath them weaken. Changes in hormone levels or the immune system can also change the way the bones degenerate and rebuild themselves.

As a child, your bones are constantly growing and getting denser. At about age 25, you hit your peak bone mass. As an adult, you can help maintain this peak bone mass by staying active and eating a diet with enough calories, calcium, and vitamin D. But maintaining this bone mass gets more difficult as we get older. Age makes building bone mass more difficult. In women, the loss of estrogen at menopause can cause the bones to lose density very rapidly.

The bone cells responsible for building new bone are called osteoblasts. Stimulating the creation of osteoblasts helps your body build bone and improve bone density. The bone cells involved in degeneration of the bones are called osteoclasts. Interfering with the action of the osteoclasts can slow down bone loss.

In high-turnover osteoporosis, the osteoclasts reabsorb bone cells very quickly. The osteoblasts can't produce bone cells fast enough to keep up with the osteoclasts. The result is a loss of bone mass, particularly trabecular bone--the spongy bone inside vertebral bones and at the end of long bones. Postmenopausal women tend to have high-turnover osteoporosis (also known as primary type one osteoporosis). This relates to their sudden decrease in production of estrogen after menopause. Bones weakened by t...

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