Patellar Tendonitis Treatment Forest Grove OR

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Hatsumi Y Park, DMD
(503) 359-5408
1911 Mountain View Ln Ste 100
Forest Grove, OR
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Bart Rask
(509) 648-0803
349 Se 7th Ave
Hillsboro, OR
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Dr.Bart Rask
(509) 648-0803
349 Southeast 7th Avenue
Hillsboro, OR
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Or Hlth Sci Univ Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1989
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
3.6, out of 5 based on 5, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Bruce Douglass Fiske, DMD
(503) 648-0859
400 E Main St Ste 280
Hillsboro, OR
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
John Milton Coletti, MD
(503) 681-1000
335 SE 8th Ave
Hillsboro, OR
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Cornell Univ Med Coll, New York Ny 10021
Graduation Year: 1964

Data Provided By:
Dr.John Austin
(503) 452-0915
21255 NW Jacobson Rd # 500
Hillsboro, OR
Gender
M
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
2.0, out of 5 based on 4, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Ronald Lee Lohman, MD
(503) 844-6599
862 SE Oak St Ste 3B
Hillsboro, OR
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Finch U Of Hs/Chicago Med Sch, North Chicago Il 60664
Graduation Year: 1979

Data Provided By:
Donald Anders Peterson, MD
(503) 648-0803
349 SE 7th Ave
Hillsboro, OR
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Or Hlth Sci Univ Sch Of Med, Portland Or 97201
Graduation Year: 1974

Data Provided By:
Anton Farny Eilers, MD
(503) 648-0803
349 SE 7th Ave
Hillsboro, OR
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Cornell Univ Med Coll, New York Ny 10021
Graduation Year: 1965

Data Provided By:
Ronald Lewis Teed
(503) 681-9676
425 Se Baseline St
Hillsboro, OR
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Patellar Tendonitis

A Patient's Guide to Patellar Tendonitis

Introduction

Alignment or overuse problems of the knee structures can lead to strain, irritation, and/or injury. This produces pain, weakness, and swelling of the knee joint Patellar tendonitis (also known as jumper's knee) is a common overuse condition associated with running, repeated jumping and landing, and kicking.

This guide will help you understand

  • what parts of the knee are involved
  • how the problem develops
  • how doctors diagnose the condition
  • what treatment options are available

Anatomy

What parts of the knee are involved?

The patella (kneecap) is the moveable bone on the front of the knee. This unique bone is wrapped inside a tendon that connects the large muscles on the front of the thigh, the quadriceps muscles, to the tibia lower leg bone.

The large quadriceps muscle ends in a tendon that inserts into the tibial tubercle, a bony bump at the top of the tibia (shin bone) just below the patella. The tendon together with the patella is called the quadriceps mechanism. Though we think of it as a single device, the quadriceps mechanism has two separate tendons, the quadriceps tendon on top of the patella and the infrapatellar tendon or patellar tendon below the patella.

Tightening up the quadriceps muscles places a pull on the tendons of the quadriceps mechanism. This action causes the knee to straighten. The patella acts like a fulcrum to increase the force of the quadriceps muscles.

The long bones of the femur and the tibia act as level arms, placing force or load on the knee joint and surrounding soft tissues. The amount of load can be quite significant. For example, the joint reaction forces of the lower extremity (including the knee) are two to three times the body weight during walking and up to five times the body weight when running.

Related Document: A Patient's Guide to Knee Anatomy

Causes

What causes this problem?

Patellar tendonitis occurs most often as a result of stresses placed on the supporting structures of the knee. Running, jumping, and repetitive knee flexion into extension (e.g., rising from a deep squat) contribute to this condition. Overuse injuries from sports activities is the most common cause but anyone can be affected, even those who do not participate in sports or recreational activities.

There are extrinsic (outside) factors that are linked with overuse tendon injuries of the knee. These include inappropriate footwear, training errors (frequency, intensity, duration), and surface or ground (hard surface, cement) being used for the sport or event (such as running). Training errors are summed up by the rule of "toos". This refers to training too much, too far, too fast, or too long. Advancing the training schedule forward too quickly is a major cause of patellar tendonitis.

Intrinsic (internal) factors such as age, flexibility, and joint laxity are also important. Malalignment of the foo...

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