Pediatric Orthopedics Rogersville TN

This page provides useful content and local businesses that can help with your search for Pediatric Orthopedics. You will find helpful, informative articles about Pediatric Orthopedics, including "Keeping Up With the Latest in Children's Orthopedics". You will also find local businesses that provide the products or services that you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Rogersville, TN that will answer all of your questions about Pediatric Orthopedics.

Jeanne Rose Pamilla, MD
(423) 638-6713
1420 Tusculum Blvd
Greeneville, TN
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Med Coll Of Pa, Philadelphia Pa 19129
Graduation Year: 1968

Data Provided By:
Richard W Pectol Jr, MD
223 N Main St
Greeneville, TN
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: E Tn State Univ J H Quillen Coll Of Med, Johnson City Tn 37614
Graduation Year: 1994

Data Provided By:
Thomas M Webster
(423) 639-3157
401 Takoma Ave
Greeneville, TN
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
James D Mc Kinney, MD
(931) 526-9518
438 Vann Road East South
Greeneville, TN
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Al Sch Of Med, Birmingham Al 35294
Graduation Year: 1981

Data Provided By:
D Marshall Jemison, MD
(423) 756-7134
979 E 3rd St
Chattanooga, TN
Business
The Plastic Surgery Group PC
Specialties
Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Michael Joseph Menz, MD
(423) 639-2103
1406 Tusculum Blvd
Greeneville, TN
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Va Sch Of Med, Charlottesville Va 22908
Graduation Year: 1989

Data Provided By:
Joe Lynn Henley, DDS
(423) 639-3196
151 Mason St
Greeneville, TN
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Walter Clay Chapman, MD
(423) 639-2103
223 N Main St
Greeneville, TN
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Va Sch Of Med, Charlottesville Va 22908
Graduation Year: 1965

Data Provided By:
Thomas Moore Webster, MD
1241 Tanglewood Dr
Greeneville, TN
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: George Washington Univ Sch Of Med & Hlth Sci, Washington Dc 20037
Graduation Year: 1964

Data Provided By:
Joseph David Hicks, DDS
(865) 777-5700
11217 W Point Dr
Knoxville, TN
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Keeping Up With the Latest in Children's Orthopedics

One way physicians have to keep up with the rapidly changing discoveries in medicine is by reading journals. Sometimes it's just a matter of browsing various journals to see what's happening. In other cases, a specific journal title may catch the physician's eye as being worth the time to sit-down and read it page-by-page.

One of the services the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) provides is a specialty update on various topics in orthopedics. In the June 2010 issue of The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, updates are provided on a wide variety of pediatric orthopedic conditions. The word pediatric tips us off immediately that the focus group is children.

Children don't suffer from the joint aches and pains experienced by older adults plagued by arthritis. Instead, they have sports injuries (or other traumatic injuries), orthopedic problems they might be born with (e.g., developmental dysplasia of the hip, clubfoot), and tumors. The recent increase in antibiotic resistant bacteria leading to skin and muscle infections has affected children as well as adults.

These and other conditions are discussed in this update/review article. The authors searched all other published journals and materials related to children's orthopedic problems. Then they put together a summary of what's new. The areas they focused on included the upper extremity, hip, lower extremity, foot, and spine. They also presented an update on tumors, neuromuscular disease, and trauma seen in a typical pediatric orthopedic practice.

Here are a few key points from each section:

  • Children hospitalized in intensive care units (ICU) must be watched carefully as most cases of acute compartment syndrome and fracture are caused by hospital procedures.
  • The practice of screening every infant for hip dysplasia has been questioned. Does it really help identify children who have hip dislocations? Studies continue to support this practice along with early treatment using a Pavlik harness.
  • When a dislocated hip from hip dysplasia is forced back into the socket, it can cut off the blood supply to the head of the femur (thigh bone). The final result can be osteonecrosis (death of the bone). Use of imaging studies like ultrasound and MRIs can help monitor hip position and prevent this complication of treatment.
  • Athletes who tear their anterior cruciate ligaments (ACL) can expect full return to sports. But as with adults, there will be some adolescents who do not get full recovery of the quadriceps function even after a year. Additional rehab will be needed.
  • Tourniquets used during knee surgery (like for an ACL repair), can be too tight for too long and end up causing problems. Surgeons are advised to use a special device that automatically sets the amount of tourniquet pressure applied throughout the procedure. This has the effect of limiting the amount of blood in the surgical field without causing injury to the leg.
  • Bone cysts are often seen in ...
  • Click here to read the rest of this article from eOrthopod.com