Shoulder Surgeons North Platte NE

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Peter B Brassard, MD
(308) 534-6655
611 W Francis St Ste 290
North Platte, NE
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Georgetown Univ Sch Of Med, Washington Dc 20007
Graduation Year: 1971

Data Provided By:
Benjamin Bissell, MD
North Platte, NE
Specialty
Orthopaedic Sugeon

Data Provided By:
Mark Kimball Mc Kenzie, MD
(308) 534-6655
3000 W Leota St
North Platte, NE
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Sd Sch Of Med, Vermillion Sd, 57069
Graduation Year: 1986

Data Provided By:
Dennis P McGowan, MD
(308) 237-0889
1215 First Ave
Kearney, NE
Business
Dennis P McGowan MD
Specialties
Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
William Rudolph Hamsa, MD
(402) 552-2500
4239 Farnam St
Omaha, NE
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ne Coll Of Med, Omaha Ne 68198
Graduation Year: 1958

Data Provided By:
John David Hannah, MD
(308) 534-6655
611 W Francis St Ste 290
North Platte, NE
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Loma Linda Univ Sch Of Med, Loma Linda Ca 92350
Graduation Year: 1993

Data Provided By:
John W Haugen, DDS
(308) 534-1783
611 W Francis St # 230
North Platte, NE
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Benjamin Bissell, MD
(308) 534-6655
215 McNeel Lane
North Platte, NE
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgeon, Sports Medicine

Charles Eugene Giangarra, MD
(402) 280-4342
3802 Raynor Pkwy
Bellevue, NE
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Suny-Hlth Sci Ctr At Brooklyn, Coll Of Med, Brooklyn Ny 11203
Graduation Year: 1981

Data Provided By:
Kenneth Robert Pitz, MD
(402) 721-0090
2740 N Clarkson St
Fremont, NE
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Languages
English
Education
Medical School: Creighton Univ Sch Of Med, Omaha Ne 68178
Graduation Year: 1982
Hospital
Hospital: Fremont Area Med Ctr, Fremont, Ne; Nebraska Methodist Hospital, Omaha, Ne; Alegent Health Immanuel Med Ct, Omaha, Ne; Alegent Health -Memorial Hosp, Schuyler, Ne; St Francis Memorial Hospital, West Point, Ne
Group Practice: Heartland Orthopae

Data Provided By:
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Surgeons Recommend Broad Patient Assessment After Surgery for Shoulder

Before and after measurements of pain, motion, strength, and function are a good way to track which patients improve with surgery and rate the level of success or failure for each procedure. But there are over 30 different tests that can be done. All are not equal or reliable. So, to help surgeons decide which test to use and when to use it, this article reviews many of the commonly used before and after outcomes measures.

You may even recognize the names of some of these tests: the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) shoulder outcome score, the Constant Shoulder Score, Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH), the Western Ontario Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder Index (WOOS).

The American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) test has been around for the last 15 years. It was developed by a committee with the hope of using it for research. The ASES can be used with all patients no matter what's wrong with the shoulder. And it can be used for patients treated conservatively (nonoperatively) as well as for those who end up having surgery for their shoulder problem.

The ASES assesses pain, instability, and function (activities of daily living or ADLs). The one major disadvantage of this test is the level of difficulty in calculating the score. It is widely used in the U.S. and Europe and can be used for research and for a general idea of how the shoulder is doing.

The Constant score is used to measure before and after results from surgery, but it can be used with nonsurgical cases as well. It does measure pain, activities of daily living (ADLs), shoulder motion, and strength.

But the Constant score test has not been validated for all different kinds of shoulder problems. And there are problems with examiner bias when it comes to measuring strength and motion. So, for now, the authors of this article who reviewed all the tests don't recommend using it until some of these issues have been ironed out.

Everyone agrees that the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) is a good measure of disability for the arm that can stand alone (i.e., other tests aren't needed along with it). It's a questionnaire patients take answering questions about symptoms and physical function.

It can be completed quickly, scored with moderate ease, and used with many different shoulder problems (e.g., arthritis, tendinitis, psoariatic arthritis, rotator cuff problems and repair, shoulder joint replacement). For general assessment and worker's compensation claims, the DASH can't be beat.

And finally, the Western Ontario Osteoarthritis of the Shoulder Index (WOOS) is rated the best for assessing results of total shoulder replacement and treatment for arthritis of the shoulder. The patient answers 19 questions about symptoms (including pain), sport, recreation, work, lifestyle, and emotional function.

This test can be given in a variety of languages including English, Spanish, French, and German. The WOOS can even b...

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