Somatoform Disorder Specialists Lake Charles LA

Local resource for somatoform disorder specialists in Lake Charles. Includes detailed information on local clinics that provide access to somatoform disorder specialists, as well as advice and content on somatoform ailments, psychologists, and psychosomatic diseases.

Paul P Matthews, DO
(337) 310-0153
810 W Bayou Pines Dr
Lake Charles, LA
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Ok State Univ, Coll Of Osteo Med, Tulsa, Ok 74107
Graduation Year: 1989

Data Provided By:
David Buttross III, MD
(337) 478-9331
100 S Ryan St
Lake Charles, LA
Specialties
Psychiatry, Child & Adolescent Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: La State Univ Sch Of Med In Shreveport, Shreveport La 71130
Graduation Year: 1991

Data Provided By:
Garrett Blaine Ryder, MD
(337) 562-8100
1204 W Prien Lake Rd
Lake Charles, LA
Specialties
Geriatrics, Geriatric Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: La State Univ Sch Of Med In Shreveport, Shreveport La 71130
Graduation Year: 1990

Data Provided By:
Dewey Dale Archer Jr, MD
(337) 477-7091
2829 4th Ave Ste 150
Lake Charles, LA
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Tulane Univ Sch Of Med, New Orleans La 70112
Graduation Year: 1983

Data Provided By:
Peter M Mahony, MD
(337) 478-9331
914 5th St
Lake Charles, LA
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Graduation Year: 2007

Data Provided By:
Patrick Joseph Moore, MD
(812) 949-1290
524 S Ryan St
Lake Charles, LA
Specialties
Anesthesiology, Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Wi Med Sch, Madison Wi 53706
Graduation Year: 1974

Data Provided By:
Ehtesham Ul-Haq Syed, MD
2829 4th Ave Ste 150
Lake Charles, LA
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Dow Med Coll, Univ Of Karachi, Karachi, Pakistan
Graduation Year: 1990

Data Provided By:
Vidushi Ramesh Babber, MD
2829 4th Ave
Lake Charles, LA
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: St George'S Univ, Sch Of Med, St George'S, Grenada
Graduation Year: 1999

Data Provided By:
Alan Carl Sconzert, MD
(337) 433-8400
501 S Ryan St
Lake Charles, LA
Specialties
Neurology, Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Wright State Univ Sch Of Med, Dayton Oh 45401
Graduation Year: 1986

Data Provided By:
James M Anderson, MD
(337) 433-7918
748 Bayou Pines East Dr Ste D
Lake Charles, LA
Specialties
Psychiatry
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Oral Roberts Univ Sch Of Med, Tulsa Ok 74137
Graduation Year: 1984

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Accurate Diagnosis First Step in Treating Somatoform Disorders

All patients with chronic physical pain are not alike and shouldn't be treated the same. That's the basis of this article on somatoform disorders. Somatoform disorders refer to aches and pains that are amplified (blown out of proportion) because of underlying psychologic or emotional distress. Vague complaints of muscle or joint pain, fatigue, stomach problems, numbness and tingling, headaches, and so on are typical physical complaints associated with somatoform disorders. But despite all medical tests and lab work ordered, the physician is unable to find anything wrong. Treatment is general, rather than specific to the problem.

Somatoform disorders include a number of different problems all placed in this one category. These include somatization disorder, conversion disorder, hypochondriasis, body dysmorphic disorder, and factitious disorder. The common feature of all these disorders is symptom amplification. The main symptom is usually, but not always, pain. The lack of any evidence that there's anything physically wrong to explain these disorders has led some experts to suggest dropping somatoform disorders as a real diagnosis.

But that's where the authors of this article differ. They suggest that there's a definite need to look deeper and not only find ways to diagnose these problems but also to treat each one specifically. That's a concept they refer to as diagnosis-specific and patient specific treatment. And after briefly describing each condition, they offer some treatment guidelines with the hope that someday we will have specific guidelines for each different disorder, rather than general management techniques.

Health care professionals, especially psychologists and psychiatrists, depend on a publication put out by the American Psychiatric Association called the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual or DSM as it is more commonly referred to. The DSM includes criteria for each somatoform disorder such as signs and symptoms and known causes or risk factors. In addition to a brief review of each disorder, the authors added an extensive table comparing each disorder and offering physicians some treatment guidelines for each one.

Here's a brief summary of the main disorders. Somatization disorder includes vague reports of pain, gastrointestinal problems, sexual problems, and symptoms that suggest a neurologic problem but with no identifiable cause. The problems described by patients last for years and no medical condition can be found to explain them. Conversion disorder describes neurologic symptoms (e.g., numbness, paralysis, blindness, unable to speak) in response to mental, psychologic, and/or emotional stress. Usually, there is a conflict or stress that occurs just prior to the conversion taking place. In the past, conversion was referred to as hysteria. Women are affected more often than men (2:1 ratio).

Most people are familiar with the term hypochondriac -- someone who is always sick, afrai...

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