Spinal Surgery Specialists Kalispell MT

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Bertrand Francis Jones, MD
(406) 752-7900
111 Sunnyview Ln Ste A
Kalispell, MT
Specialties
Orthopedics, Hand Surgery
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Chicago, Pritzker Sch Of Med, Chicago Il 60637
Graduation Year: 1987

Data Provided By:
Rodney Dale Brandt
(406) 752-7900
111 Sunnyview Ln
Kalispell, MT
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Dr.Kim Stimpson
(406) 752-6784
350 Heritage Way # 1200
Kalispell, MT
Gender
M
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
3.0, out of 5 based on 4, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Lawrence John Iwersen
(406) 752-7900
111 Sunnyview Ln
Kalispell, MT
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Kim D Stimpson
(406) 752-6784
350 Heritage Way
Kalispell, MT
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
John Wm Hilleboe, MD
(406) 752-7900
111 Sunnyview Ln Ste A
Kalispell, MT
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Wa Sch Of Med, Seattle Wa 98195
Graduation Year: 1965

Data Provided By:
Parley Kurt Thorderson
(406) 752-6784
350 Heritage Way
Kalispell, MT
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Dr.Don Ericksen
(406) 752-7900
All Families Healthcare, 1060 North Meridian Road
Kalispell, MT
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Wa Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1992
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Online Appt Scheduling: Yes
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
5.0, out of 5 based on 2, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Albert David Olszewski
(406) 752-7900
111 Sunnyview Ln
Kalispell, MT
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Stanley Harland Makman
(406) 752-7900
111 Sunnyview Ln
Kalispell, MT
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
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Spinal Tumors

A Patient's Guide to Spinal Tumors

Introduction

A tumor is an abnormal growth of tissue. There are several types of tumors that can develop in or near the spine. There are many types of spinal tumors. They can involve the spinal cord, nerve roots, and/or the vertebrae (bones of the spine) and pelvis.

There are two classifications of spine tumors. A spinal tumor can be primary, meaning it comes from cells within or near the spine. Primary tumors of the spine are rare. More commonly a spinal tumor that is found is a secondary spinal tumor. This means that the tumor traveled there from somewhere else in the body.

Tumors can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

This guide will give you a general overview of spinal tumors and help you understand

  • what parts of the spine are involved
  • what causes spinal tumors
  • how doctors diagnose the condition
  • what treatment options are available

Anatomy

What parts of the spine are involved?

The cervical spine is formed by the first seven vertebrae. The cervical spine starts at the bottom edge of the skull. It ends where it joins the top of the thoracic spine. The thoracic spine is where the chest begins and is made up of twelve vertebrae. This region is different than the other areas of the spine because it has ribs attached to the vertebrae. It ends where it joins with the lumbar spine. The lumbar spine is made up of five vertebrae in the lower back. It joins with the sacrum or pelvis at the bottom.

Each vertebra is formed by a round block of bone, called a vertebral body. A bony ring attaches to the back of the vertebral body. When they are stacked on top of one another, the rings form a hollow tube called a neural arch. This forms a canal where the spinal cord is located. The spinal cord is protected by the bone. The spinal cord begins at the base of the brain, just below the medulla or brain stem. It ends in the lumbar spine at about the first or second lumbar vertebrae where it is called the conus medullaris. Here it splits into many fibers. This is called the cauda equina because it looks like a horse's tail.

The spinal cord is a tube of nerve cells that is hollow in the middle. It carries sensory and motor messages to and from the body and the brain. It is surrounded by layers of tissue and fluid called the cerebral spinal fluid. It is housed in the vertebral or spinal column which is made up of 24 bones, called vertebrae. Vertebrae are stacked on top on one another to form the spinal column. The spinal column is the body's main upright support.

There are three layers of tissue that surround the spinal cord. The thin, delicate lining of the spinal cord is the pia mater. The next layer is the arachnoid membrane. It was named that because it looks like a spider web. The outermost layer that is thicker and tougher is called the dura mater. These layers are continuous with the layers covering ...

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