Spinal Surgery Specialists Mustang OK

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Harvey C Jenkins Jr., MD
(405) 686-1700
8603 S Western Ave
Oklahoma City, OK
Business
Aria Orthopedics
Specialties
Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Michael James Davoli, MD FACS
(405) 350-6770
1617 Professional Cir
Yukon, OK
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: New Jersey
Graduation Year: 1977

Data Provided By:
Stephen Mc Cullough, DDS
(405) 350-1343
508 W Vandament Ave # 200
Yukon, OK
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
James August Rosacker, MD
(405) 378-4470
3130 SW 89th St Ste 100
Oklahoma City, OK
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ok Coll Of Med, Oklahoma City Ok 73190
Graduation Year: 1973

Data Provided By:
Paul Daniel Maitino, DO
2149 SW 59th St Ste 201
Oklahoma City, OK
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of New England, Coll Of Osteo Med, Biddeford Me 04005
Graduation Year: 1992

Data Provided By:
Dr.Michael Davoli
(405) 350-6770
1617 Professional Circle
Yukon, OK
Gender
M
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
2.3, out of 5 based on 3, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Stuart Brady Stephens, DDS
(405) 350-0700
1025 E Vandament Ave Ste 100
Yukon, OK
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Neal Conrad Capel, MD
(601) 605-0934
Yukon, OK
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Languages
Spanish
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Md Sch Of Med, Baltimore Md 21201
Graduation Year: 1955

Data Provided By:
John Bernard Hughes
(405) 682-5351
2149 Southwest 59th Street
Oklahoma City, OK
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
James August Rosacker
(405) 378-8141
3110 Sw 89th St
Oklahoma City, OK
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Spinal Tumors

A Patient's Guide to Spinal Tumors

Introduction

A tumor is an abnormal growth of tissue. There are several types of tumors that can develop in or near the spine. There are many types of spinal tumors. They can involve the spinal cord, nerve roots, and/or the vertebrae (bones of the spine) and pelvis.

There are two classifications of spine tumors. A spinal tumor can be primary, meaning it comes from cells within or near the spine. Primary tumors of the spine are rare. More commonly a spinal tumor that is found is a secondary spinal tumor. This means that the tumor traveled there from somewhere else in the body.

Tumors can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

This guide will give you a general overview of spinal tumors and help you understand

  • what parts of the spine are involved
  • what causes spinal tumors
  • how doctors diagnose the condition
  • what treatment options are available

Anatomy

What parts of the spine are involved?

The cervical spine is formed by the first seven vertebrae. The cervical spine starts at the bottom edge of the skull. It ends where it joins the top of the thoracic spine. The thoracic spine is where the chest begins and is made up of twelve vertebrae. This region is different than the other areas of the spine because it has ribs attached to the vertebrae. It ends where it joins with the lumbar spine. The lumbar spine is made up of five vertebrae in the lower back. It joins with the sacrum or pelvis at the bottom.

Each vertebra is formed by a round block of bone, called a vertebral body. A bony ring attaches to the back of the vertebral body. When they are stacked on top of one another, the rings form a hollow tube called a neural arch. This forms a canal where the spinal cord is located. The spinal cord is protected by the bone. The spinal cord begins at the base of the brain, just below the medulla or brain stem. It ends in the lumbar spine at about the first or second lumbar vertebrae where it is called the conus medullaris. Here it splits into many fibers. This is called the cauda equina because it looks like a horse's tail.

The spinal cord is a tube of nerve cells that is hollow in the middle. It carries sensory and motor messages to and from the body and the brain. It is surrounded by layers of tissue and fluid called the cerebral spinal fluid. It is housed in the vertebral or spinal column which is made up of 24 bones, called vertebrae. Vertebrae are stacked on top on one another to form the spinal column. The spinal column is the body's main upright support.

There are three layers of tissue that surround the spinal cord. The thin, delicate lining of the spinal cord is the pia mater. The next layer is the arachnoid membrane. It was named that because it looks like a spider web. The outermost layer that is thicker and tougher is called the dura mater. These layers are continuous with the layers covering ...

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