Spinal Surgery Specialists Waupaca WI

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Kim Harold Lulloff, MD
Waupaca, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Med Coll Of Wi, Milwaukee Wi 53226
Graduation Year: 1960

Data Provided By:
David Michael Henneghan, MD
(715) 342-7950
190 Grand Seasons Dr
Waupaca, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Mi State Univ Coll Of Human Med, East Lansing Mi 48824
Graduation Year: 1984
Hospital
Hospital: St Michaels Hospital, Stevens Point, Wi
Group Practice: Ministry Health Care At Rice Medical Center; Rice Medical Center Ministry Health Care

Data Provided By:
Sean P Keane MD
(414) 277-1155
2015 E Newport Ave
Milwaukee, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Paul F Shuler
(920) 885-2663
705 S University Avenue
Beaver Dam, WI
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Jose Abran Padilla
(715) 832-1400
4212 Southtown Dr
Eau Claire, WI
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
James Henry De Weerd, MD
(715) 345-5100
190 Grand Seasons Dr
Waupaca, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Bowman Gray Sch Of Med Of Wake Forest Univ, Winston-Salem Nc 27157
Graduation Year: 1972

Data Provided By:
Dr. Rodney Lefler
Neuroscience Group of NE Wisconsin
920-725-9373 or toll free 800-201-1194
1305 W. American Drive
Neenah, WI
Specialty
Chiropractor
Conditions
Cervical spine disorders,Degenerative disc disease,Degenerative spinal conditions,Herniated disc / bulging disc,Lumbar spine disorders,Muscle pain / muscle strain,Neck pain,Sciatica / radiculopathy,Scoliosis and deformity,Spinal stenosis,Spondylolisthesis,Sports injuries,Thoracic spine disorders,Whiplash
Treatments
Exercise,McKenzie Method,Musculoskeletal manipulation,Physical therapy,Rehabilitation,Sports medicine,Strength and Conditioning
Proffesional Affiliation
Wisconsin Chiropractic Association,National Strength and Conditioning Association

Edgar O Hicks
(715) 834-2701
836 Richard Dr
Eau Claire, WI
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Michael John Maslowski, DDS
(920) 231-4922
2626 W 9th Ave
Oshkosh, WI
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Laura Jean Prokuski, MD
(608) 263-1375
600 Highland Ave
Madison, WI
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ia Coll Of Med, Iowa City Ia 52242
Graduation Year: 1992

Data Provided By:
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Spinal Tumors

A Patient's Guide to Spinal Tumors

Introduction

A tumor is an abnormal growth of tissue. There are several types of tumors that can develop in or near the spine. There are many types of spinal tumors. They can involve the spinal cord, nerve roots, and/or the vertebrae (bones of the spine) and pelvis.

There are two classifications of spine tumors. A spinal tumor can be primary, meaning it comes from cells within or near the spine. Primary tumors of the spine are rare. More commonly a spinal tumor that is found is a secondary spinal tumor. This means that the tumor traveled there from somewhere else in the body.

Tumors can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

This guide will give you a general overview of spinal tumors and help you understand

  • what parts of the spine are involved
  • what causes spinal tumors
  • how doctors diagnose the condition
  • what treatment options are available

Anatomy

What parts of the spine are involved?

The cervical spine is formed by the first seven vertebrae. The cervical spine starts at the bottom edge of the skull. It ends where it joins the top of the thoracic spine. The thoracic spine is where the chest begins and is made up of twelve vertebrae. This region is different than the other areas of the spine because it has ribs attached to the vertebrae. It ends where it joins with the lumbar spine. The lumbar spine is made up of five vertebrae in the lower back. It joins with the sacrum or pelvis at the bottom.

Each vertebra is formed by a round block of bone, called a vertebral body. A bony ring attaches to the back of the vertebral body. When they are stacked on top of one another, the rings form a hollow tube called a neural arch. This forms a canal where the spinal cord is located. The spinal cord is protected by the bone. The spinal cord begins at the base of the brain, just below the medulla or brain stem. It ends in the lumbar spine at about the first or second lumbar vertebrae where it is called the conus medullaris. Here it splits into many fibers. This is called the cauda equina because it looks like a horse's tail.

The spinal cord is a tube of nerve cells that is hollow in the middle. It carries sensory and motor messages to and from the body and the brain. It is surrounded by layers of tissue and fluid called the cerebral spinal fluid. It is housed in the vertebral or spinal column which is made up of 24 bones, called vertebrae. Vertebrae are stacked on top on one another to form the spinal column. The spinal column is the body's main upright support.

There are three layers of tissue that surround the spinal cord. The thin, delicate lining of the spinal cord is the pia mater. The next layer is the arachnoid membrane. It was named that because it looks like a spider web. The outermost layer that is thicker and tougher is called the dura mater. These layers are continuous with the layers covering ...

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