Sports Dietitian Meriden CT

This page provides useful content and local businesses that give access to Sports Dietitians in Meriden, CT. You will find helpful, informative articles about Sports Dietitians, including "Pass the Carbohydrates, Please". You will also find local businesses that provide the products or services that you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Meriden, CT that will answer all of your questions about Sports Dietitians.

Anne Young, CDE, MS, RD
(203) 694-8784
Mistate Medical Center435 Lewis Ave
Meriden, CT
 
Amy Lynn Krystock, RD
(203) 671-3392
65 Mountain Brook Circle
Cheshire, CT
 
Debra G Swanson, RD
(960) 940-6300
Bristol Hospital Center for Diabetes102 N Street
Bristol, CT
 
Betsy Friedman Davis, LDN, RD
(860) 657-8742
45 S Main StSte 208
West Hartford, CT
 
Sharon Werner, RD, CDN
(860) 944-9776
6 Raymond Road
Avon, CT
 
Claire L Liva Erris, RD
1010 Amherst Place
Cheshire, CT
 
Barbara McCarty, RD
(203) 484-2460
1320 Middletown Ave
Northford, CT
 
Jennifer Lim, RD
(203) 281-7555
Hamden Health Care Center1270 Sherman Ln
Hamden, CT
 
Diane J Bussolini, CDE, CDN, RD
(860) 267-9684
15 Myrtle Rd
East Hampton, CT
 
Joseph Van Gilder
669 Enfield Street
Enfield, CT
Services
Sports Nutrition
Membership Organizations
International Society of Sports Nutrition

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Pass the Carbohydrates, Please

Intense training can create big muscles and improve speed and performance. But heavy training can also stress athletes' bodies, draining them of the ability to effectively repair themselves or fight off disease. Research has suggested that decreased glutamine, an amino acid formed in the body, might be one reason for impaired immune systems during intense training.

These researchers attempted to understand the way carbohydrates in the diet and intensity of exercise affected glutamine levels in the blood and muscles. They tested five male bike racers during three days of intense exercise on two different diets. One diet regimen provided 45% of the calories from carbohydrates, and the other was 70% carbohydrate. At different times in the study, the athletes' blood was drawn and their muscles were tested to see how much glutamine was present in the muscles.

The study showed that the high-carbohydrate diet resulted in higher levels of glutamine in the blood throughout the days of intense exercise. Concentrations within the muscles, however, were about the same with each diet. The authors noted a small decrease in muscle glutamine while on the lower carbohydrate diet, although it wasn't that significant. They suggest that future research should include more subjects to get a better idea of glutamine concentrations in the muscles.

The study also showed that the amount of dietary carbohydrate did not affect levels of glycogen within the muscles. (Glycogen is basically extra carbohydrates stored in the muscles and liver.) Glycogen is needed to help the body form glutamine. The authors feel it is possible that their study's restriction on eating until two hours after exercise affected this measurement. They also feel it is possible that tissue damage from the intense exercise may have kept the glycogen levels low after exercise.

It appears that a diet higher in carbohydrates reduces the amount of protein taken in by the athlete. The higher carbohydra...

Click here to read the rest of this article from eOrthopod.com