Tendinopathy North Little Rock AR

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Alexander Stephen Kita, DDS
(501) 758-9697
Ste 126 2504 Mccain Blvd
N Little Rock, AR
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Billy D Vaden, DDS
(501) 758-4112
5401 John F Kennedy Blvd
N Little Rock, AR
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Harold Gene Hutson, MD
(501) 227-4150
North Little Rock, AR
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ar Coll Of Med, Little Rock Ar 72205
Graduation Year: 1957

Data Provided By:
Kenneth Marx Rosenzweig, MD
(501) 666-2824
8 Marbais Pl
Little Rock, AR
Specialties
Orthopedics, Occupational Medicine
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Ar Coll Of Med, Little Rock Ar 72205
Graduation Year: 1982

Data Provided By:
Dr.Carl Nelson
(501) 686-7813
1 Children's Way
Little Rock, AR
Gender
M
Education
Medical School: In Univ Sch Of Med
Year of Graduation: 1959
Speciality
Orthopedic Surgeon
General Information
Hospital: U A M S Med Ctr, Little Rock, Ar
Accepting New Patients: Yes
RateMD Rating
4.5, out of 5 based on 1, reviews.

Data Provided By:
Michael Quick, DDS
(501) 758-1741
2501 Crestwood Rd Ste 303
N Little Rock, AR
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Charles A Redmond, DDS
(501) 753-5594
4137 John F Kennedy Blvd
N Little Rock, AR
Specialties
Orthodontics/Dentofacial Orthopedics

Data Provided By:
Lyn D Ward, MD
(501) 804-7301
112 Challain Dr
Little Rock, AR
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Male
Education
Medical School: U Of Tx Med Sch At Houston, Houston Tx 77225
Graduation Year: 1996
Hospital
Hospital: United Regional Health Care -, Wichita Falls, Tx

Data Provided By:
James Aronson
(501) 364-1100
800 Marshall St # 653
Little Rock, AR
Specialty
Orthopedic Surgery

Data Provided By:
Laurie Theresa Olbrich, MD
(501) 614-2000
800 Marshall St
Little Rock, AR
Specialties
Orthopedics
Gender
Female
Education
Medical School: Univ Of Tx Med Branch Galveston, Galveston Tx 77550
Graduation Year: 1988

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Best Treatment for Tendinopathy

It’s not clear what is the best treatment for tendinopathy. That’s the conclusion of researchers reviewing all the published studies on the topic. Tendinopathy refers to a painful tendon condition caused by overuse. Although it feels like it, it’s not the same as tendonitis. There’s pain but no actual inflammation.

Treatment has traditionally focused on providing anti-inflammatory measures. This has included nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), steroid injections, and physical therapy modalities. Stretching and strengthening exercises have always been a part of the standard treatment approach.

More recently, shock wave therapy, low-level laser therapy, sclerotherapy, and growth factors and stem cell treatment have been added. The results of all treatment methods were compared by performing a literature review. The authors summarized the results of 177 studies. They did not evaluate the quality of the work done.

For the most part, it appears that NSAIDs and cortisone injections offer short-term relief. There just isn’t a long-term benefit of these treatments. Results using heat and light modalities seem inconsistent. But this may be more likely to occur because of how the studies were conducted. Without consistent methods and measures, it’s difficult to compare one study to another.

The most effective treatment may be eccentric lengthening exercises, sclerotherapy, and nitric oxide patches. Eccentric exercises are done by placing the affected muscle in a shortened position then lengthening the muscle against resistance.

Sclerotherapy is the injection of a chemical to produce scarring in the blood vessels. The idea is to close down tiny blood vessels and destroy nerve fibers that form in the damaged area. Nitric oxide has some potential for tendon healing. A patch placed over the skin delivers an enzyme that acts as a chemical messenger to provide pain relief.

Newer treatments such as growth factors and stem cells look promisin...

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